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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement by the left flank-battle of North Anna-an incident of the March-moving on Richmond-South of the Pamunkey-position of the National Army (search)
ad previously been sent, through Halleck, for Butler to send [William F.] Smith's corps to White House. This order was repeated on the 25th, with directions that they should be landed on the north side of the Pamunkey, and marched until they joined the Army of the Potomac. It was a delicate move to get the right wing of the Army of the Potomac from its position south of the North Anna in the presence of the enemy. To accomplish it, I issued the following order: Quarles' Mills, Va., May 25, 1864 Major-General Meade, Commanding A. P. Direct Generals Warren and Wright to withdraw all their teams and artillery, not in position, to the north side of the river to-morrow. Send that belonging to General Wright's corps as far on the road to Hanover Town as it can go, without attracting attention to the fact. Send with it Wright's best division or division under his ablest commander. Have their places filled up in the line so if possible the enemy will not notice their withdrawal.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
0, 1864. Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck: The enemy are evidently relying for supplies greatly on such as are brought over the branch road running through Staunton. On the whole, therefore, I think it would be better for General Hunter to move in that direction; reach Staunton and Gordonsville or Charlottesville, if he does not meet too much opposition. If he can hold at bay a force equal to his own, he will be doing good service. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Jericho Ford, Va., May 25, 1864. Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck: If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canal should be destroyed beyond possibility of repairs for weeks. Completing this he could find his way back to his original base, or from about Gordonsville join this army. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on the 5th of June at Piedmon
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
. The enemy are evidently relying for supplies greatly on such as are brought over the branch road running through Staunton. On the whole, therefore, I think it would be better for General Hunter to move in that direction; reach Staunton and Gordonsville or Charlottesville, if he does not meet too much opposition. If he can hold at bay a force equal to his own, he will be doing good service . . . . U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. Jericho Ford, Va., May 25th, 1864. If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canal should be destroyed beyond possibility of repairs for weeks. Completing this, he could find his way back to his original base, or from about Gordonsville join this army. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and, moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on the 5th of June at
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
key, one of the affluents of the York, formed by the junction of the North and South Anna rivers, which would force Lee to abandon the line of those streams, and give to the Army of the Potomac an admirable water base of supplies, at White House. The chief base of the army, while it was at Spottsylvania Court-House, was at Fredericksburg; while it was on the North Anna that base was Port Royal, on the Rappahannock. Sheridan, who, as we have seen, See page 313. had just returned May 25, 1864. to the army after his great raid toward Richmond and across the head of the Peninsula, now led the flanking column with two divisions of cavalry, immediately followed by Wright's corps, leading Warren's and Burnside's. Hancock's remained on the North Anna until morning, May 27. to cover the rear, at which time the head of the column, after y a march of more than twenty miles, was approaching the Pamunkey at Hanovertown, about fifteen miles from Richmond. Wright's corps crossed that str
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
ank Johnston out of his new position, by moving far to the right, and concentrating his troops at Dallas. Thomas advanced along the road from Kingston, while McPherson moved farther to the right by way of Van Wert. Schofield went eastward of both, so as to come in on Thomas's left. The Confederate leader quickly perceived his peril, and prepared to avert it. As the latter was moving toward Dallas from Burnt Hickory, Hooker's corps in the advance, Geary's division of that corps was met May 25, 1864. near Pumpkinvine Creek, by Confederate cavalry. These he pushed over that stream, and saved a bridge they had fired. Following them eastward two miles, he came upon the foe in strong battle order. A sharp conflict ensued; and when, at four o'clock, Hooker had his whole corps well in hand, he made a bold push, by Sherman's order, to secure possession of a point at the New Hope Church, where the roads from Ackworth, Marietta, and Dallas meet. But a stormy night coming on, Hooker, thoug
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
ssels, but all the others in the sounds of North Carolina, would have been at the mercy of the enemy. These considerations made it important for Captain Smith to avoid risking a defeat, and that he was successful in getting rid of the ram, and depriving her for the time being of power to do further mischief, is proof that he was master of the situation. This was the view taken of the affair by the Navy Department, as is shown by the following complimentary letter: Navy Department, May 25, 1864. Sir — I have had great satisfaction in receiving and perusing your report, as the senior officer of the several vessels that were engaged with the rebel rain Albemarle and her tender on the 5th instant, in Albemarle Sound. The Department congratulates all the officers and men of the United States Navy who participated in this remarkable contest between wooden gun-boats and a formidable armored vessel, in which the latter was forced to retreat to prevent capture, and it particularly
ghting done by this arm of the service.   Killed. Wounded. Captured and Missing. Total. Beverly Ford, Va., June 9, 1863 81 403 382 866 Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-4, 1863 90 352 407 849 Gettysburg campaign, June 12--July 24, not including Gettysburg 219 866 1,471 2,556 Brandy Station, Va., Aug. 1, 1863 21 104 20 145 Mine Run, Va., Nov. 26--Dec. 2, 1863 28 119 77 224 Wilderness, Va., May 5-7, 1864 97 416 197 710 Hawes' Shop, Old Church, Ashland, Aenon Church, Va., etc., May 25-30, 1864 110 450 96 656 Cold Harbor, Va., May 31--June 6, 1864 51 328 70 449 Sheridan's First Expedition, Va., May 9-24, 1864, Beaver Dam Station, Yellow Tavern, Meadow Bridge, etc. 64 337 224 625 Trevilian Raid, Va., June 7-24, 1864 150 738 624 1,512 Wilson's Raid, Va., June 22-30, 1864 71 262 1,119 1,452 Deep Bottom, Weldon Railroad, Reams' Station, Petersburg, etc., Va., August 1-30, 1864 64 269 122 455 Chaffin's Farm, Peebles' Farm, etc., Va., Sept. 1-30, 1864 24 121 33
ade. At Cedar Mountain, the regiment lost 17 killed, 66 wounded, and 25 missing; at Antietam, 27 killed and 173 wounded, out of 340 engaged; at Chancellorsville, 18 killed, 74 wounded, and 9 missing. Lieut.-Col. Louis H. Crane was killed at Cedar Mountain, and Lieut.-Col. John W. Scott at Chancellorsville. The Corps was transferred, in September 1863, to Tennessee, and in 1864, under the designation of the Twentieth, was engaged in the advance on Atlanta. The regiment was hotly engaged May 25, 1864, at New Hope Church, Ga., where it lost 15 killed, and 96 wounded. During the Atlanta campaign it was constantly under arms and, almost daily, under fire; its losses from Resaca to Atlanta, amounted to 23 killed, 162 wounded, and 1 missing. Having reenlisted, it preserved its organization until the close of the war, and marched with Sherman to the Sea. Fifth Wisconsin Infantry. Russell's Brigade — Wright's Division--Sixth Corps. (1) Col. Amasa Cobb; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. (2) Col. T<
  May 23-27, 1864             6th New York H. A. ------------ ---------- 17 99 17 133 170th New York Gibbon's Second 22 55 22 99 3d Maine Birney's Second 12 40 18 70 56th Massachusetts Crittenden's Ninth 8 47 19 74 57th Massachusetts Crittenden's Ninth 10 28 8 46 7th Indiana Cutler's Fifth 8 31 4 43 182d New York Gibbon's Second 6 28 6 40 93d New York Birney's Second 6 27 4 37 149th Pennsylvania Cutler's Fifth 7 23 26 56 New Hope Church, Ga.             May 25, 1864.             107th New York Williams's Twentieth 26 141 -- 167 3d Wisconsin Williams's Twentieth 15 96 -- 111 Pickett's Mills, Ga.             May 27, 1864.             49th Ohio Wood's Fourth 52 147 4 203 89th Illinois Wood's Fourth 16 71 67 154 41st Ohio Wood's Fourth 26 70 6 102 15th Ohio Wood's Fourth 19 64 19 102 5th Kentucky Wood's Fourth 14 58 10 82 15th Wisconsin Wood's Fourth 14 41 28 83 1st Ohio Wood's Fourth 10 73 -- 83
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
m, running between high banks, so steep that they form almost a ravine, and, for the most part, heavily wooded with oak and tulip trees, very luxuriant. It is perhaps 125 feet wide and runs with a tolerably swift and deep stream, in most places over one's head. The approaches are by steep roads cut down the banks, and how our waggons and artillery got across, I don't know! Indeed I never do know how the trains get up, seeing that you are not over well off, sometimes, on a horse. . . . May 25, 1864 Burnside's Corps, hitherto a sort of fifth wheel, was today incorporated in the A. of P., and so put under Meade. . . . The enemy, with consummate skill, had run their line like a V, Lee, concentrating his troops, interposed them between the two wings of the Union Army, which were widely separated, and could reinforce neither the other without passing over the river twice. Grant, wrote Nicolay and Hay, was completely checkmated --Rhodes, IV, 444. with the point on the river, so th
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