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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for May 25th, 1864 AD or search for May 25th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
key, one of the affluents of the York, formed by the junction of the North and South Anna rivers, which would force Lee to abandon the line of those streams, and give to the Army of the Potomac an admirable water base of supplies, at White House. The chief base of the army, while it was at Spottsylvania Court-House, was at Fredericksburg; while it was on the North Anna that base was Port Royal, on the Rappahannock. Sheridan, who, as we have seen, See page 313. had just returned May 25, 1864. to the army after his great raid toward Richmond and across the head of the Peninsula, now led the flanking column with two divisions of cavalry, immediately followed by Wright's corps, leading Warren's and Burnside's. Hancock's remained on the North Anna until morning, May 27. to cover the rear, at which time the head of the column, after y a march of more than twenty miles, was approaching the Pamunkey at Hanovertown, about fifteen miles from Richmond. Wright's corps crossed that str
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
ank Johnston out of his new position, by moving far to the right, and concentrating his troops at Dallas. Thomas advanced along the road from Kingston, while McPherson moved farther to the right by way of Van Wert. Schofield went eastward of both, so as to come in on Thomas's left. The Confederate leader quickly perceived his peril, and prepared to avert it. As the latter was moving toward Dallas from Burnt Hickory, Hooker's corps in the advance, Geary's division of that corps was met May 25, 1864. near Pumpkinvine Creek, by Confederate cavalry. These he pushed over that stream, and saved a bridge they had fired. Following them eastward two miles, he came upon the foe in strong battle order. A sharp conflict ensued; and when, at four o'clock, Hooker had his whole corps well in hand, he made a bold push, by Sherman's order, to secure possession of a point at the New Hope Church, where the roads from Ackworth, Marietta, and Dallas meet. But a stormy night coming on, Hooker, thoug