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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 25th, 1864 AD or search for May 25th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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* * * * * The enemy are evidently relying for supplies greatly on such as are brought over the branch road running through Staunton. On the whole, therefore, I think it would be better for General Hunter to move in that direction; reach Staunton and Gordonsville or Charlottesville, if he does not meet too much opposition. If he can hold at bay a force equal to his own, he will be doing good service. * * U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. Jericho ford, Va., May 25, 1864. If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canal should be destroyed beyond possibility of repairs for weeks. Completing this, he could find his way back to his original base, or from about Gordonsville join this army. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on the fifth of June at
nued far into the night. Our batteries have just begun to fire again slowly, and the pit must be retaken to-day at whatever cost, for its loss will be the loss of our position on the Peninsula. in the woods back of Bermuda hundred, Virginia, May 25, 1864. Things are not working nor promising altogether well just now, in General Butler's command. For more than a week past the whole army here has been as good as shut up within its intrenchments back of Bermuda Hundred, and, instead of prosec I had been well assured of, that right here, in several instances, the rebel bloodhounds had been seen murdering our wounded men whom they found lying helpless before them. The attack on Fort Powhatan. Headquarters of General Butler, May 25, 1864. General Wilde is in command at Wilson's wharf, on the north side of the James. He has a garrison, all negroes, with artillery belonging to the colored battery raised by General Butler. Wilson's wharf implies more than the name suggests.