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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 18 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
aken in the heats of summer, unprecedented in the fatigues and exposures it has caused, I have had more than reason to be proud of the officers and men of this division. In battles, in bloody skirmishes, in marches, they have more than realized my expectations. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army of the Cumberland. Addenda. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the month ending May 31, 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, from May 3 to June 5. 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, June 6, 1864. Report of casualties Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the month ending June 30, 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
Sheridan's Trevilian raid. by Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. See Sheridan's Richmond raid, p. 188, of which this article is a continuation, for a map giving Sheridan's route in the Trevilian raid.--editors. While Torbert and Gregg had been engaged near Cold Harbor, Wilson had been operating on our right flank. He fought at Mechump's Creek on May 31st, 1864; Ashland, June 1st; and Hawes's Shop and Totopotomoy Creek, June 2d. The fight at Ashland was brought on by McIntosh, in a successful dash at the railroad bridges over the South Anna. The permanent injury of Lee's lines of supply was an important element in Grant's purposes. To this end, on the 26th of May, Hunter was directed to move down the Shenandoah Valley to Lynchburg, cut the canal, and return over the Lynchburg branch of the Virginia Central to Charlottesville, where it was expected he would meet Sheridan. That officer was again to cut loose from the army, and, after tearing up the Vir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
onsisted of the 1st Massachusetts, 1st New Jersey, 10th New York, and 1st Pennsylvania. The Second Brigade was commanded by Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, and consisted of the 2d Pennsylvania, 4th Pennsylvania, 8th Pennsylvania, 13th Pennsylvania, and 16th Pennsylvania, making twenty-two regiments in the two divisions. Sheridan had four batteries of horse artillery, Batteries H and I, 1st United States (Regulars), Battery D, 2d United States, and Battery M, 2d United States. The returns of May 31st, 1864, show 450 officers and 9889 men present for duty in the First and Second divisions, making a total of 10,337 officers and men. Sheridan estimated his effective force in that fight at 8000.--editors. Hampton's command consisted of, as I have stated, Butler's brigade, the 4th, 5th, and 6th South Carolina; Rosser's brigade, 7th, 11th, and 12th Virginia, and White's battalion of two companies; Young's brigade, Cobb's Legion, ten companies; Phillips Legion, six companies.; Jeff Davis L
les of General Grant's campaigns in Virginia; Lieutenant-Colonel George Dare, who was in command, was killed at the Wilderness. The regiment left the field on May 31, 1864, and proceeded to Harrisburg, where it was mustered-out, June 13. 1864. Eighth Pennsylvania Reserves (37th Pennsylvania Infantry). Fisher's Brigade — Ca., May 27, 1864 2 Chancellorsville, Va. 6 Dallas, Ga., May 28, 1864 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 6 Dallas, Ga., May 29, 1864 1 Wauhatchie, Tenn. 13 Dallas, Ga., May 31, 1864 3 Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 3 Pine Knob, Ga., June 15, 1864 4 Resaca, Ga. 5 Culp's Farm, Ga., June 17, 1864 3 Cassville, Ga. 1 Grier's Farm, Ga., June 2ta, Ga. 7 Stone's River, Tenn. 52 Jonesboro, Ga. 10 Chickamauga, Ga. 48 Jacksonboro, Ga. 2 Buzzard's Roost, Ga. 2 Bentonville, N. C. 1 Dallas, Ga., May 31, 1864 6 Goldsboro, N. C., March 24, 1864 1 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 4 Place unknown 2 Present, also, at Dry Mountain, Ky.; Bowling Green, Ky.; Lavergne, Tenn.;
4 58 10 82 15th Wisconsin Wood's Fourth 14 41 28 83 1st Ohio Wood's Fourth 10 73 -- 83 Hawes's Shop, Va.             May 28, 1864.             1st N. Jersey Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 7 53 3 63 5th Michigan Cavalry Torbert's Cavalry 8 42 -- 50 1st Penn. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 10 32 -- 42 10th N. York Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 13 27 2 42 6th Mich. Cavalry Torbert's Cavalry 3 22 8 33 6th Ohio Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 9 24 2 35 Totopotomoy, Va.             May 29-31, 1864.             36th Wisconsin (4 Cos.) Gibbon's Second 20 108 38 166 7th New York H. A. Barlow's Second 22 97 16 135 2d New York H. A. Barlow's Second 7 77 7 91 Hanover, Va.             May 30, 1864.             2d Ohio Cavalry Wilson's Cavalry 5 50 10 65 Bethesda Church, Va. Right of the Army; the left rested at Cold Harbor.             June 1, 1864.             45th Pennsylvania Potter's Ninth 18 141 22 181 58th Massa
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ad not strength to fight them! The firing was so heavy that, despite the late hour, General Meade ordered Hancock and Burnside to advance, so as to relieve Warren. Only Gibbon had time to form for an attack, and he drove back their front line and had a brief engagement, while the other commands opened more or less with artillery; and so the affair ended with the advantage on our side.--The swamp magnolias are in flower and the azaleas, looking very pretty and making a strong fragrance. May 31, 1864 Last night, what with writing to you and working over some maps of my own, I got to bed very late, and was up tolerably early this morning, so to-day I have passed a good deal of time on my back fast asleep; for the General has not ridden out and has sent out very few officers. As I implied, to-day has been an occasion of Sybarite luxury. What do you think we mustered for dinner? Why, green peas, salad, potatoes, and fresh milk for the coffee! Am I not a good forager? Yes, and ice
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
er, unless it is to take the turret off, and, with some additional strengthening, put casemates about her. This, when done, will enable her to lie at some of the points on the river where a formidable vessel is required. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Congratulatory letter to Pear-Admiral D. D. Porter. Navy Department, May 31, 1864. sir: The Department acknowledges the receipt of your interesting report of the sixteenth instant, giving a detailed and graphic account of the rescue of the Mississippi squadron from its perilous position above the falls at Alexandria, Red River, and of the aid which you received through the indomitable perseverance and engineering skill of Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Acting Military Engineer of the Nineteenth army corps. It is with no ordinary feelings of pleasure that the departm
. While Pleasonton's cavalry at Gettysburg was preventing Stuart from joining in Pickett's charge, Robertson led the horse artillery which seconded the efforts of Pleasonton's leaders, Gregg and Buford and Kilpatrick, whose exploits were not second to those of the infantry. For gallant and meritorious service in this campaign Robertson was promoted to lieutenant-colonel. He had been promoted to major for his gallantry at the battle of Gaines' Mill on the Peninsula. He was made colonel May 31, 1864, for gallant and meritorious service in the battle of Cold Harbor, and brigadier-general for distinguished service while chief of horse artillery attached to the Army of the Potomac during the campaign from May to August, 1864, including the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Hawes' Shop, and Trevilian Station. He died, a soldier full of years and honors, January 24, 1891. Cothran's rifled guns, with their supporting infantry, a brigade, drove away the threatening skirmishers a
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
rmy (with temporary rank) Anderson, R. H., May 31, 1864. Early, Jubal A., May 31, 1864. Stewart, May 31, 1864. Stewart, A. P., June 23, 1864. Major-generals, provisional army Anderson, J. P., Feb. 17, 1864. Bate, Wr, John C., July 7, 1864. Cox, William R., May 31, 1864. Dubose, D. M., Nov. 16, 1864. Dunnovant,nedy, J. D., Dec. 22, 1864. Lewis, Wm. G., May 31, 1864. Lilley, Robt. D., May 31, 1864. Miller, May 31, 1864. Miller, William, Aug. 2, 1864. Palmer, Joseph B., Nov. 15, 1864. Robertson, F. H., July 26, 1864. Sanders, J. C. C., May 31, 1864. Sharp, Jacob H., July 26, 1864. Shelley, Chas. M., Sept. 17, 1864. Smit Moxley, Oct. 27, 1864. Terrill, James B., May 31, 1864. Terry, Wm. R., May 31, 1864. Toon, ThomaMay 31, 1864. Toon, Thomas F., May 31, 1864. Wallace, Wm. H., Sept. 20, 1864. York, Zebulon, May 31, 1864. Young, Wm. H., May 31, 1864. Wallace, Wm. H., Sept. 20, 1864. York, Zebulon, May 31, 1864. Young, Wm. H., Aug. 15, 1864. Brigadier-generals, for service with volunteer troops (with temporary rank) ArmsMay 31, 1864. Young, Wm. H., Aug. 15, 1864. Brigadier-generals, for service with volunteer troops (with temporary rank) Armstrong, F. C., Jan. 20, 1863. Dearing, James, April 29, 1864. Thomas, Bryan M., Aug. 4, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lincoln, Abraham 1809- (search)
by Mr. Washburne, member of Congress from Illinois, and taken to Willard's Hotel. The Gettysburg speech. At the dedication of the National Cemetery on the Gettysburg battle-field, Nov. 19, 1863, Mr. Lincoln delivered his immortal speech, which will be found in the article on Gettysburg. His re-election. In the administration party were men who deprecated the cautious policy of Mr. Lincoln and were opposed to his re-election. They held a nominating convention at Cleveland, O., May 31, 1864. It was composed of about 350 persons, very few of whom were regularly chosen delegates. They were called the radical men of the nation. They adopted a platform of principles, consisting of thirteen resolutions, among which was one Lincoln's Inkstand. proposing an amendment to the Constitution to prevent the re-establishment of slavery; another declaring the wisdom of the Monroe doctrine (q. v.) ; a third asserting the policy of restricting the incumbency of the Presidential office
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