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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 524 524 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June, 1864 AD or search for June, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ge enough to float the ram Tennessee over Dog River bar. No one doubted but that Buchanan would be successful if any one could be, and Farragut expected that he would come out and attack him with his whole force of ironclads, besides the three gun-boats, and so wrote urgent letters in the middle of May to the Navy Department, requesting that ironclads be sent him. It was the most uncomfortable position that any officer was placed in during the war, when told by the Department as late as June, 1864, that the vessels could not be furnished because the contractors had not come up to their contract. But the Admiral bore it all bravely, and with his usual equanimity prepared his wooden ships to do the best they could in the coming conflict. Not until May 25th does Farragut speak of the Tennessee having arrived in the Mobile Roads, and anchored under the guns of Fort Morgan. He went in as close as he could, examined her with good glasses, and satisfied himself that all that had been
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
r lying on a wharf all ready for immediate use. They were conveniently handled, and could be laid down rapidly and easily. Woods and Thompson say that with one boat they placed them at the rate of four in an hour. This kind of torpedo was the most convenient of all, and the most dangerous, though, being liable to shift with the current, they were apt to trouble those who used them. One rebel steamboat (Marion) had been blown up in the Ashley River some time ago by one of them; and, in June, 1864, another rebel steamer, plying from Sumter up the harbor, was struck by one and beached on the shoal near Johnson, to prevent sinking in deep water, supposed at the time to have been run ashore accidentally. It is probable that the Tecumseh was sunk at Mobile, in Admiral Farragut's attack, by one of this kind; also the Milwaukee. the Osage, the Rudolph, and a tin-clad (48, in the recent captures of the forts. My own flag-ship, the Harvest Moon, was destroyed by the same device, in G