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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 158 158 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 17th, 1864 AD or search for June 17th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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. The rebel soldiers set up a broad laugh, and the last my informants A company of Western Virginians, who deserted the sinking ship of the conspirators, and came into our lines yesterday, tells this story, which is well authenticated by the circumstances.--some thirty in all, including four commissioned officers — saw of the Adjutant, he was stalking away, with the order in his hand, ejaculating derisively, Over the left! in a horn! and what will come next! Big Shanty, Georgia, June 17, 1864. Joe Johnson holds steadily on his position, twenty-six miles north of Atlanta, though the heavy skirmishing along his front for the past three days, has compelled him to sharply define his lines. His line is now closely circumscribed by ours. In no place are the hostile parallels more than a musket-shot apart. The rebel right rests on Kenesaw Mountain, on the railroad, four miles north of Marietta, their left on Lost Mountain, some six miles west of Kinesaw. Between these two f
Everything seemed and promised well. There was no straggling, no murmuring, no complaining. Every man bore evidence of health and strength, and seemed conscious of the place he was filling and the duty he was performing. The horses looked strong and well: no protruding ribs or shrunken necks, but as if their power of endurance had not been half tried. And so they crossed and disappeared into Secessia, one hundred and thirty thousand men! Walthall's farm, near Petersburg, Six A. M., June 17th, 1864. The Eighteenth corps, under command of General W. F. Smith, which had but just returned to Bermuda Hundred, although greatly needing rest, moved out at three o'clock on the morning of the fifteenth on the Petersburg side of the river. They were joined by General Hinks' division United States colored troops, which had crossed the pontoon bridge over the Appomattox, at ten o'clock the night before. This division consisted of Duncan's brigade, the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Twenty-seco