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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 49 49 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 3 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 24th, 1864 AD or search for June 24th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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h horse and rider were distanced this time. I am, dear sir, Very truly yours, L. Dyer, Surgeon Eighty-first Illinois. Colonel McMillen's letter. headquarters, First brigade, First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Moscow, Tenn., June 24, 1864. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the twenty-second instant, requesting me to give you a statement in writing, setting forth my views of the causes of our defeat at Brice's cross-roads, my knowlWaring, commanding. The Second brigade, Third and Fourth Iowa, Tenth Missouri, and Seventh Illinois cavalry, Colonel E. F. Winslow commanding. Another account. camp fifty-Fifth U. S. Colored infantry, Fort Pickering, Memphis, Tenn., June 24, 1864. sir: I wish to give you some particulars of the defeat and disastrous rout of our forces in the expedition under General Sturgis--particulars that fell under my own observation, for I was in the midst of them during their occurrence. O
d to jump at the conclusion that the contestants had mutually agreed to a truce for the day. In front of Whitaker, however, there was a portion of the field upon which were thickly strewn the dead and wounded of the enemy in his seven desperate assaults upon that invincible brigade. There a brisk fire was kept up all day, to prevent the rebels from getting off their wounded. General Whitaker counted one hundred and sixty rebel dead on the ground. in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, June 24, 1864. The problem here has not yet been solved, though our troops go to sleep every night expecting to find no enemy in their front. Kenesaw Mountain is still in the hands of the enemy, though our right wing has wheeled nearly around it, and threatens directly and imminently their rear. Yesterday morning we were within three miles of Marietta — this morning but two. Our shell go into the pretty and aristocratic town, and the roar of musketry is never out of the ears of the startled inha
Doc. 64. the attack on Laclede, Mo. St. Joseph, Mo., June 24, 1864. On last Saturday afternoon one of the boldest raids of the season was perpetrated on the town of Laclede, in Linn county, situated on the Hannibal and St. Joseph railroad. A party of guerrillas, numbering thirty men, all well armed and mounted, entered and commenced shooting and plundering. They first made for the post-office. Knowing that the muskets and ammunition of the town company was in there, they took possession, and frightened the postmaster nearly out of his wits. Four of the gang undertook to break open the safe, which contained from five to seven thousand dollars; but finding it it too tedious a job, they gave it up. They stole what they saw worth taking, and left. Others of the gang went to the drug store of Mr. Jones, but he, seeing them approaching, fled, but was shot and immediately killed. They then made for a dry goods store. The proprietor, seeing them coming, prepared himself with
cessarily, An important campaign is commenced, and upon its results depends more than we can estimate. The Major-General commanding asks and expects from every man of his command a hearty and cheerful compliance with orders, assuring all that they shall reap and enjoy the full fruits of whatever their labors and privations may obtain. By command of Major-General Ransom: Walter K. Martin, A. A. G. Brigadier-General Ned McCausland, Commanding Brigade. headquarters cavalry division, June 24, 1864. General Order, No. 2. The following act of Congress, approved June first, 1864, is published for the information of this command: The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact that the commanding General of any army in the field shall have the power to direct the dismounting of any non-commissioned officer or officers, soldier or soldiers, in the cavalry service in his command, and to place him or them in the infantry, who shall misbehave before the enemy, or s