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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 61 (search)
of operations June 28-September 8. Hdqrs. Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 18, 1864. Sir: In accordance with circular orders dated headquarters First Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, September 9, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Eighth Regiment Kansas Veteran Volunteers in the Date campaign against Atlanta: The regiment returned from veteran furlough and joined the brigade at Kenesaw Mountain June 28, 1864, and was with the brigade during all the marches, skirmishing, and fighting from that time until the end of the campaign. The regiment did no special service during the campaign, but with the Lrigade did its regular turns of skirmishing, picketing, fatigue, and such other duties as were required of it. The regiment assisted the brigade in building nine lines of breast-works during the campaign, and was fifty-nine days under fire. Our loss during the campaign was 6 killed, 20 wounded, a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
taken in both. The later report from the surgeons gives an increase in the number of wounded from 397 to 473. This indicates that there may be further inaccuracies. A few men are probably treated in the hospitals for slight wounds who leave the hospitals before their names are taken. Other men, slightly wounded, are treated by the surgeons on the field and never go to the hospitals. Others, desperately wounded, leave their commands and die without ever reaching the hospitals. General Davis' report can be relied upon as nearly correct. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General, Commanding. Inclosure. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, In the Field, June 28, 1864. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourteenth Army Corps: Captain: The following is a corrected report of the casualties in this division, as given by the brigade commanders in yesterday's operations: Zzz Jef. C. Davis, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
topographical engineer; Lieut. George Scroggs, ordnance officer — I am again under obligations for their zealous assistance throughout the campaign. Their duties were often exceedingly arduous, and were always performed by them with skill and alacrity, whether on the field of battle or elsewhere. No list of casualties accompanies this report. This will be found in General Morgan's report, which closes with the termination of the campaign. Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourteenth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, In the Field, June 28, 1864. Captain: The following is a corrected report of the casualties in this division as given by the brigade commanders in yesterday's operations: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jef. C. Davis, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourteenth Army Corps. Zzz Zz
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
nd moved from in front of Kenesaw toward the right; were on the road all night, marching four miles; halted in rear of the Fourth Corps, and remained all day. June 27, at 6 a. m. the command, in light marching order, moved forward to the front in support of the Second and Third Brigades, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, forming the second line; occupied the advanced works of our former line, and held them during the battle; casualties, Corpl. William E. McDaniel, Company (C, killed. June 28, 29, 30, July 1, 2, the regiment occupies the same position as on the 27th; constant skirmishing on the line; no casu-:alties reported. July 3, it being ascertained that the enemy had retreated from our front, the regiment moved with command through Marietta to a point five miles beyond Marietta, where the enemy were found in force; marched to the front and intrenched; no casualties reported. July 4, the regiment was ordered out to support the Sixtieth Illinois early this morning, and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
after denying the truth of the report of the committee, undertook to show, by the most feeble special pleading, that the massacre was justifiable, especially on the ground that some of the soldiers were of a servile race ; and said, without pretending to cite an instance of such atrocity among civilized nations, I respectfully refer you to history for numerous instances of indiscriminate slaughter after successful assault, even under less aggravated circumstances. --Letter of S. D. Lee, June 28, 1864. The friends of Forrest afterward attempted to avert from him the scorn of mankind, by alleging that be was not in immediate command, and therefore not responsible for the massacre. Confederate reports silenced the falsehood by saying: Generals Forrest and Chalmers both entered the fort from opposite sides, simultaneously, and an indiscriminate slaughter followed. One hundred prisoners were taken, and the balance slain. The fort ran with blood. --Cited by W. J. Tenney, in his Military
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
9 87 1,238 10 5,981 77 New Orleans June 26, 1865 Penobscot. Schooner Malta 8,636 46 1,650 03 6,986 43 do Aug. 22, 1865 Glide. Schooner Mary Ellen 5,082 00 830 67 4,251 33 do Aug. 16, 1865 Kanawha. Schooner Mary 804 84 127 20 677 64 Key West Aug. 12, 1865 Pursuit. Schooner Medora 12,452 05 3,853 08 8,598 97 New Orleans Aug. 21, 1865 J. P. Jackson, Stockdale. Schooner Nelly 1,164 83 732 16 432 67 Philadelphia Mar. 2, 1863 Alabama. Brig Napier 4,702 57 1,005 79 3,696 78 do June 28, 1864 Mount Vernon, Mystic, Chippewa, Stars and Stripes. Sloop (no name Waiting for prize lists of the Commodore Morris.) 488 65 188 09 300 56 Washington   Commodore Morris. Schooner Newcastle 34,921 35 2,686 62 32,234 73 Key West Oct. 16, 1862 Bainbridge. Bark (slave, name unknown Waiting for prize list of the Annie, a tender.) 9,631 27 591 39 9,039 88 do Nov. 26, 1862   Brig Nahum Stetson 4,710 68 317 92 4,392 76 do Nov. 26, 1864 Brooklyn, Massachuselts. Schooner (name u<
w Market, Va., Oct. 8, 1864 1 Salem, Va., Nov. 9, 1862 1 Richmond Raid, Va., Mch. 1, 1864 2 Cedar Creek, Va., Nov. 12, 1864 3 Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863 5 New Kent C. H., Va., Mch. 3, 1864 1 Mt. Jackson, Va., Nov. 22, 1864 4 Aldie, Va., June 17, 1863 18 Craig's Church, Va., May 5, 1864 5 Ashland, Va., Mch. 15, 1865 2 Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863 2 Hanover C. H., Va., May 29, 1864 2 Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 7 Upperville, Va., June 20, 1863 1 Stony Creek, Va., June 28, 1864 2 Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1865 6 Jones's Cross Roads, Va., July 10, ‘63 2 Ream's Station, Va., June 29, 1864 4 Appomattox, Va., April 8, 1865 2 Brandy Station, Va., Sept. 14, 1863 1 Charlestown, W. Va., Aug. 22, 1864 2 On Picket and at Places Unknown 3 Present, also, at many other engagements in which it lost men wounded or captured, but none killed. notes.--Called the Harris Light in honor of the Honorable Ira Harris, of Albany, N. Y., then United States Senator. The S
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ese suggestions in the strong belief that this cavalry would serve the Confederacy far better by contributing to the defeat of a formidable invasion, than by waiting for and repelling raids. The Confederate Administration seemed to estimate the relative value of the two services differently. In these efforts, as on all other occasions when he had the power, I was zealously seconded by Governor Brown. This led to the following correspondence between him and the President: Atlanta, June 28, 1864. His Excellency Jefferson Davis: I need not call your attention to the fact that this place is to the Confederacy almost as important as the heart is to the human body. We must hold it. I have done all in my power to reinforce and strengthen General Johnston's army. As you know, further reinforcements are greatly needed on account of the superior numbers of the enemy. Is it not in your power to send more troops Could not Forrest or Morgan, or both, do more now for our cause in Sh
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Colonel Browne, Aide-de-camp. (search)
General Polk regards this promotion as important as I do. J. E. Johnston, General. Note.-Bad health makes General Canty unable to serve in the field. Near Marietta, June 13, 1864. General Bragg, Richmond: I earnestly suggest that Major-General Forrest be ordered to take such parts as he may select of the commands of Pillow, Chalmers, and Roddy, all in Eastern Alabama, and operate in the enemy's rear between his army and Dalton. J. E. Johnston, General. Near Marietta, June 28, 1864. General S. Cooper, Richmond: I have received your dispatch inquiring why three regiments had not been sent to Savannah in exchange for those of Mercer's brigade. They have not been sent, because, before Mercer's brigade joined, we were engaged with an enemy more than double our numbers, and ever since have been in his immediate presence. I considered the fact that the Government Canty's troops. reinforced us from the coast afterward proof that my course was right. The thr
Doc. 7.-General Hooker on the Rapidan. The following is a copy of a letter from Major-General J. J. Peck to Andrew D. White, Vice-President of the Onondaga Historical Association. It was accompanied by a map of Suffolk, showing Longstreet's, Hill's, and Hood's operations in April and May, 1863, during the short campaign of General Hooker on the Rapidan. New York, June 28, 1864. Sen. A. D. White, Vice-President Onondaga Historical Association, Syracuse: Sir: Permit me to present through you, to the Onondaga Historical Association, a map of Suffolk, Va., and the adjacent region. It is a section of a map which I had prepared while in command of the U. S. forces on the south side of the James River. It is of especial interest as presenting the theatre of operations of one wing of Lee's army, under Lieutenant-General Longstreet, Hill, and Hood, from April tenth to May third, 1863. Although Hill was not present all the time, he was operating with Longstreet, and by his order
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