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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 151 151 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 94 94 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 23 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and other points. Aug. 15,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 13 (search)
lost the valuable services of several officers killed in battle during the campaign, viz: Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery; Capt. S. M. McDowell, Company B, Independent Pennsylvania Artillery; Capt. William Wheeler, Thirteenth New York Battery; First Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres, Sixth Ohio Battery; Second Lieut. F. Henchen, Company I, First New York Artillery. Our loss in guns was four 3-inch Rodmans-two belonging to the Eighteenth Indiana Battery, lost on General McCook's raid, July 30, 1864; two of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, lost on General Kilpatrick's raid, August 20, 1864. I would here take the opportunity to mention the effective service of the batteries serving with the cavalry command-Tenth Wisconsin Battery, Capt. Y. V. Beebe; Eighteenth Indiana Battery, First Lieut. W. B. Rippetoe, and the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, First Lieut. G. I. Robinson, commanding-during the entire campaign. In every instance where these batteries were engaged they did goo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
honor to forward the following as the report of casualties of my command for the month of June: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. James S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps, Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 17, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command for the days of July 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, 1864: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command for the month of August, 1864: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
reason of any kind for his condemnation. I am to-day as ignorant of the causes for his action as I was then. That they were purely personal, and had not the remotest connection with my conduct as a soldier, I submit is proved by his own testimony, and it is upon this question alone that I care to defend myself. In The century magazine for September, 1886, Captain Joel B. Erhardt contributed the following extract from a letter that had never been made public: College Point, L. I., July 30th, 1864. Hon. S. Foot. dear Senator: I am extremely anxious that my friends in my native State [Vermont] should not think that the reason of General Grant relieving me from duty was brought about by any misconduct of mine, and therefore I write to put you in possession of such facts in the case as I am aware of, and think will throw light upon the subject. . . . On my return from a short leave of absence, on the 19th of July, General Grant sent for me to report to him, and then told me th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The colored troops at Petersburg. (search)
The colored troops at Petersburg. by Henry Goddard Thomas, Brevet Major-General, U. S. V. Guidon of Thomas's Brigade of the colored division--Shaded parts, Green; the field, White. East of Petersburg, on high ground, protruding like the ugly horn of a rhinoceros, stood the Confederate earthwork, fortified as a battery, which we undermined and exploded July 30th, 1864. It did a good deal of goring before we destroyed it. Its position enabled the garrison to throw a somewhat enfilading fire into our lines, under which many fell, a few at a time. For some time previous to the explosion of the mine it was determined by General Burnside that the colored division There was but one division of colored troops in the Army of the Potomac--the Fourth Division of the Ninth Corps, organized as follows: Brigadier-General Edward Ferrero, commanding division. First Brigade, Colonel Joshua K. Sigfried (of the 48th Penn.): 27th U. S. colored troops, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles J.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
ad surrendered when we ceased firing and were in the act of shifting the battery; but the idle report that junior officers had taken upon themselves to continue the action after the order had been given to cease firing is not worthy of notice. I did not hear the firing of a gun, and the discipline of the Alabama would not have permitted it.-J. McI. K. In the letter from which Captain Kell quotes Captain Winslow does not speak of continuing his fire. But in his detailed report (dated July 30th, 1864) Captain Winslow says of the Alabama, after she had winded and set sail: Her port broadside was presented to us, with only two guns bearing, not having been able, as I learned afterward, to shift over but one. I saw now that she was at our mercy, and a few more guns well directed brought down her flag. I was unable to ascertain whether it had been hauled down or shot away; but a white flag having been displayed over the stern our fire was reserved. Two minutes had not more than elaps
Missing Total. 4th U. S. Colored Infantry 15 110 10 135 22d U. S. Colored Infantry 14 116 8 138 The first opportunity to go into action granted Ferrero's Division, was at the Mine Explosion, or battle of The Crater, at Petersburg, July 30, 1864. This division was selected to lead the assault; but, at the last moment, the order was changed and it was sent in last. It was not ordered forward until the assault was a bloody failure, and although it did all that men could do, it was unnsibilty for that defeat. Still, they fought bravely, and held their ground under the most discouraging circumstances. How well they stood is attested by their terrible losses. casualties in Ferrero's Division at the battle of the Mine, July 30, 1864. Regiment. Killed. Wounded. Includes the mortally wounded. Missing. A large proportion of the missing were killed or wounded. Total. 23d U. S. Colored Infantry 74 115 121 310 29th U. S. Colored Infantry 21 56 47 124 31st U.
18 10 Poplar Spring Church, Va. 3 North Anna, Va. 11 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 10 Bethesda Church, Va. 3 Picket, July, 30, 1864 1 Cold Harbor, Va. 4 Fall of Petersburg 4 Petersburg Assault 21     Present, also, at Hatcher's Run. n9 missing; in the assault on Petersburg, June 17, 1864, 26 killed, 81 wounded, and 20 missing; at the Mine Explosion, July 30, 1864, 11 killed, 24 wounded, and 18 missing; and at the Weldon Railroad, August 19, 1864, 7 killed, 12 wounded, and 1 missilled, and 59 wounded; at Gettysburg, 27 killed, 133 wounded, and 50 missing; and in Grant's campaign — from May 5 to July 30, 1864--it lost 36 killed, 174 wounded, and 16 missing. Lieutenant-Colonel Alois O. Bachman was killed at Antietam, and Colourch; Sept. 30, 1864 2 Petersburg Assault, June 18, 1864 42 Boydton Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 1 Petersburg Mine, July 30, 1864 55 Fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1864 18 Weldon Railroad, Aug. 19, 1864 6 Petersburg Trenches, 1864 and 1865 17
Eighth 9 103 24 136 13th West Virginia Duval's Eighth 14 50 15 79 23d Illinois Mulligan's Eighth 14 63 37 114 10th West Virginia Mulligan's Eighth 12 57 43 112 Deep Bottom, Va. Or, First Deep Bottom.             July 26-29, 1864.             110th Pennsylvania Birney's Second 7 24 -- 31 11th Maine Terry's Tenth 3 29 -- 32 16th Penn. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 5 29 2 36 2d U. S. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 4 16 5 25 Petersburg Mine, Va.             July 30, 1864.             23d U. S. Colored Ferrero's In comparing losses in this engagement, it should be understood that this was the first action in which the colored troops of this division were engaged and that their ranks were comparatively full. Ninth 74 115 121 310 30th U. S. Colored Ferrero's Ninth 18 104 78 200 19th U. S. Colored Ferrero's Ninth 22 87 6 115 39th U. S. Colored Ferrero's Ninth 13 97 47 157 43d U. S. Colored Ferrero's Ninth 14 86 23 123 31
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
killed in the trenches, he is not interested; but actually he notices each tree that falls. Ah, he says, when I think what labor I have been at, on the little place I have at home, to plant, only for my grandchildren, such trees as you cut down without reason! As he has always lived in the South of France, where greenery is scarce, he is not offended by the bareness of the soil; but when riding through a dreary pine wood, will suddenly break out: Oh, que c'est beau, que c'est beau! July 30, 1864 My spirits to-night are not very high; our project of attack, which in the beginning promised well, has not been a success in the result. You must know that there has always been a point on Burnside's line that was quite near that of the enemy, say 250 feet. A mine was begun there over a month since, and has been quite finished for a week. It was at first rather an amateur affair, for the policy of the future operations had not then been fixed. However, it was steadily pushed, bein
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