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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 151 151 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 94 94 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 23 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 30th, 1864 AD or search for July 30th, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
quietly sleeping within it, dreaming, perhaps, of home and all its dear associations (for only a soldier can properly appreciate these), when a deep, rumbling sound, that seemed to rend the very earth in twain, startled me from my slumbers, and in an instant I beheld a mountain of curling smoke ascending towards the heavens. The whole camp had been aroused, and all were wondering from whence came this mysterious explosion. It was the morning of Saturday, at 4:44 o'clock, on the 30th day of July, 1864. The long-talked — of mine had been sprung, Pegram's battery of four guns was blown up, and about 278 sleeping soldiers were buried beneath the upturned earth. Immediately the leading columns of the Ninth Army Corps, U. S. A., commanded by Colonel E. G. Marshall and Brigadier-General W. F. Bartlett, pressed forward and occupied the Crater and the earthworks for a distance on either side. Two hundred cannons roared in one accord, as if every lanyard had been pulled by the same ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
llorsville, May 3, 1863; Preston Lawhorn and Robert Coffey, Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; George Hoyleman, William J. Bartlett, and George White, Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; Cyrus Goolsby, Thomas N. McCormick, and John T. Ford, Petersburg, July 30, 1864; John L. Drayboud, James T. Paxton, Franklin Shaver, and Lieutenant Samuel Wallace, Petersburg, April 2, 1865. Dicdfrom Wounds—W. H. Paxton, wounded at Strasburg, June 1, 1862;——Houcher, wounded at Cross Keys, June 8, 1862; James P. Risk, Wounded and Recovered—Hugh S. Beard, Charlottesville, May 3, 1862; James P. Cash and William H. Cash, Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; William M. Crist, Petersburg, April 2, 1865, lost leg; H. W. Decker, 1862; James P. Ford, Petersburg, July 30, 1864; George J. Hamilton, Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Robert W. Johnston, Petersburg, 1864; Robert McNutt, Spotsylvania, May 1864; D. A. Ott, Strasburg, June I, 1862, lost arm; Thomas Paxton, Strasburg, June 1, 1862; Franklin Shewey, Bristoe Stati