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Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
ich the Federals lost four thousand men. The operation was not successful, Meade states, for a coup de main depends for success upon the utmost promptitude of movement. Fifty thousand troops were ready to support it, but proper debouches had not been prepared. The Ninth Corps had great difficulty in getting over the high works in their front, and the space was too contracted to deploy troops, preventing rapidity of execution and cordial co-operation essential to success. From camp, July 31, 1864, General Lee wrote: Yesterday morning the enemy sprung a mine on one of our batteries on the line and got possession of a portion of our intrenchments. It was the part defended by General Beauregard's troops. I sent General Mahone with two brigades of Hill's corps, who charged into them handsomely, recapturing the intrenchments and guns, twelve stand of colors, seventy-three officers, including General Bartlett, his staff, three colonels, and eight hundred and fifty-five enlisted men.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
re immediately pushed forward, but the time consumed in getting them up enabled the enemy to rally from his surprise (which had been complete) and get forces to this point for its defense. The captured line thus held being untenable and of no advantage to us, the troops were withdrawn, but not without heavy loss. Thus terminated in disaster what promised to be the most successful assault of the campaign. Subordinate reports of operations against Petersburg and Richmond from June 13 to July 31, 1864, will appear in Vol. XL. Immediately upon the enemy ascertaining that General Hunter was retreating from Lynchburg by way of the Kanawha River, thus laying the Shenandoah Valley open for raids into Maryland and Pennsylvania, he returned northward, and moved down that Valley. As soon as this movement of the enemy was ascertained, General Hunter, who had reached the Kanawha River, was directed to move his troops without delay, by'river and railroad, to Harper's Ferry; but owing to th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
nd other combats. July 24, 1864.Skirmish near Cartersville. July 27, 1864.Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Army of the Tennessee. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, resumes command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard in command of the Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.M
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
Government. I have previously mentioned the death of two of my chiefs of artillery, Captains Simonson and McDowell. The place was well and ably filled by Captain Thomasson, First Kentucky Battery. Capt. J. W. Steele, Forty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, topographical engineer, rendered good and efficient service, and Captain Greenwood, besides his duty as aide-de-camp, found time to make many of the most accurate maps we possess of the various positions occupied by the army. Appended is a tabular monthly statement of the casualties of the division from the 1st of May to the 31st of July, 1864. All of which is respectfully submitted. D. S. Stanley, Major-General, Commanding First Division. Col. J. S. Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General. Inclosure. Consolidated report of casualties of the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the months of May, June, and July, 1864. Zzz D. S. Stanley, Major-General, Commanding. Atlanta, Ga., September--, 1864.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
Headquarters Army of the Cumberland. Addenda. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the month ending May 31, 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, from May 3 to June 5. 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, June 6, 1864. Report of casualties Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the month ending June 30, 1864. Zzz John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Report of casualties in Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the month ending July 31, 1864. Zzz Respectfully submitted. John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Report of casualties occurring in the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the month of August, 1864. Zzz Respectfully submitted. John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Near Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
rward the following as the report of casualties of my command for the month of June: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. James S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps, Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 17, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command for the days of July 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, 1864: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command for the month of August, 1864: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-Ge
losses; and the official statement of General Johnston's adjutant general, exhibiting the strength of the Army of Tennessee at different periods, during the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta. Strength of the Army of Tennessee, on the 31st of July, 1864; 20th September, 1864; 6th November, 1864; and 10th December, 1864. July 31st, 1864.   present. Absent.   Effective. Total. Aggregate. Total. Aggregate. Infantry 30,451 39,414 43,448 93,759 101,715 Cavalry 10,269 15,904 17,s. Killed. Wounded. Total. Hardee's 141 1,018 1,159 Lee's 248 1,631 1,879 Stewart's 93 574 667   482 3,223 3,705 Consolidation of which two Reports is as follows:   Killed. Wounded. Total. Around Atlanta, July 4th to July 31st, 1864 1,341 7,500 8,841 Atlanta and Jonesboroa, Aug. 1st to Sept. 1st, 1864 482 3,223 3,705   1,823 10,723 12,546 I certify that the above reports are from the returns made to my office, and are in my opinion correct. (Signed) A. J
rg, Va., June 26, 1863 1 Trevilian Station, Va., June 11, 1864 7 Stony Creek Station, Va., Dec. 1, 1864 3 Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863 3 King and Queen C. H., June 24, 1864 2 Hatcher's Run, Va., Feb. 6, 1865 1 Shepherdstown, Va., July 16, 1863 2 St. Mary's Church, Va., June 24, ‘64 7 Dinwiddie C. H., Va., March 31, 1865 2 Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 4 Deep Bottom, Va., July 29, 1864 2 Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865 3 Auburn, Va., Oct. 14, 1863 2 Lee's Mills, Va., July 31, 1864 2 Farmville, Va., April 7, 1865 1 Bristoe Station Va., Oct. 14, 1863 2 Ream's Station, Va., Aug. 25, 1864 2 On Picket, Va. 2 Morrisville, Va., April 17, 1864 2 Poplar Spring Church, Va., Oct. 1, ‘64 5 Place unknown 2 Present, also, at several other engagements in which it lost men, wounded or captured, but none killed. notes.--Organized at Elmira during the fall of 1861, from companies recruited in the counties of Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Erie, Fulton, Onondaga and Ste
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ously carried in in kegs (the gallery was so low, the men were forced to double themselves over in passing), and the kegs were packed in, after removing their heads. When a chamber was charged, loose powder was poured over the whole. The magazines were connected by a wooden casing filled with powder, and this was also run along the gallery for some distance, where it was connected to a fuse which ran to the mouth of the gallery. To-morrow I will continue, but now it is rather late. July 31, 1864 I will continue now my letter that broke off last night, and confide to you in all honesty, that I went fast to sleep on the bed and never woke till it was too late for more writing! The fact is, it was a day of extraordinary heat, and remarkably close also. I had been up at half-past 2 that morning, and I felt a great deal depressed by the day's work. Well, I had got my fuse to the mouth of the gallery. You must know that all the time they were putting in the powder they could he
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Consolidated Summaries in the armies of Tennessee and Mississippi during the campaign commencing May 7, 1864, at Dalton, Georgia, and ending after the engagement with the enemy at Jonesboroa and the evacuation at Atlanta, furnished for the information of General Joseph E. Johnston (search)
12,230 Around Marietta4683,4803,948 1,2218,2299,450 Consolidated Summary of Casualties of the Army of Tennessee (Army of Mississippi being merged into it) in the Series of Engagements around Atlanta, Georgia, commencing July 4, and ending July 31, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's5232,7743,297 Lee's3512,4082,759 Stewart's4362,1412,577 Wheeler's cavalry29156185 Engineer's22123 1,3417,5008,841 Consolidated Summary of Casualties in Army of Tennessee in Engagements around 1 to September 1, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's1411,0181,159 Lee's2481,6311,879 Stewart's93574667 4823,2233,705 Consolidation of which two reports is as follows: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Around Atlanta, July 4 to July 31, 18641,3417,5008,841 Atlanta and Jonesboroa August 1 to September 1, 18644823,2233,705 1,82310,72312,546 I certify that the above reports are from the returns made to my office, and are in my opinion correct. (Signed) A. J. Foard, Medical
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