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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 360 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for August, 1864 AD or search for August, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
the passage so narrow that the shoals on each hand were bare at low water, and hardly five hundred (500) feet apart, besides being directly under fire from Battery Bee at 1,100 yards, and of Mount Pleasant battery at 1,000 yards. At this time they had been so much worn-eaten that they sank, but the depth at low tide would still have rendered them troublesome to all but light-draught vessels. And Captain Gray states that they were afloat up to the last that he saw of them, which was in August, 1864. In this way the main entrance was obstructed between Sumter and Moultrie, and two of the channels leading from it were barred by piles and booms, leaving open only the main channel to the south, which was left to the control of the heavy batteries that lined it. These obstructions were defended by torpedoes, and by a series of batteries, iron-clads and torpedo-boats. After obtaining possession of the harbor, the examination which was made disclosed the use of three kinds of tor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
h by such proceedings as those of the Chickamauga is hard to conceive, for at that stage of the civil war a cruise against the coasting trade of the North could only show the desperate straits to which the Confederates were reduced, and was merely an attempt to keep up the semblance of a war on the ocean. The Atlanta made two trips to Wilmington as a blockade-runner. She was then converted into a cruiser and named the Tallahassee. Under this name she left the Cape Fear River early in August, 1864. and on the 19th of that month arrived at Halifax, after capturing and destroying several vessels. Owing to the vigilance of the authorities, who in this instance were upon the alert to prevent a violation of the neutrality laws, the Tallahassee was unable to obtain coal or othersupplies, and was obliged to return to Wilmington. In November this vessel made another attempt, under the name of the Olustee, and took a few prizes, but, returning to Wilmington, assumed her old character of