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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 360 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for August, 1864 AD or search for August, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
as wounded. Pursuing its march and almost daily skirmishing, the regiment reached Petersburg on on the 24th day of June, 1864, and commenced the desultory and dreary work of duty in the trenches. During the latter part of July, 1864, the regiment left Petersburg for Stoney Creek, and whilst on the march, Colonel William MacRae, of the 15th North Carolina regiment, joined the brigade and assumed command, under orders. This gallant officer was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in August, 1864, and from that time, never left the brigade, of which the 44th was a part, until the last day at Appomattox. From Stoney Creek, the regiment returned to Petersburg. Ream's Station. The regiment bore its part with conspicuous good conduct in the brilliant engagement at Ream's station, on the 25th of August, 1864. Upon the investment of Petersburg, the possession of the Weldon road became of manifest importance, as it was Lee's main line of communication with the South, whence he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
f the defences of St. Augustine river. He was appreciated as a scientific soldier. In the spring of 1864, when General Butler landed at City Point and threatened Petersburg, General Colston was ordered to Petersburg, where he remained in command of the lines south of the Appomattox until General Lee came with the Army of Northern Virginia. During that period General Colston kept the enemy at bay, and repelled several assaults upon our lines; in one of which his horse was shot. In August, 1864, he was placed in command of the city of Lynchburg, and ordered to strengthen its defences. There he remained on duty until after the surrender, holding the city committed to his keeping. In every field of duty General Colston served with distinguished gallantry, fidelity and ability. After the war he was without resources, except his intellect, attainments and character. He delivered lectures in Baltimore, Richmond, Raleigh and other cities, on the life and character of his colle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
r's experience. Captain Frayser was very reluctant in agreeing to write out some of his reminiscences of the imprisonment of the 600 at Morris Island. While a great portion of his time has been devoted to journalism since the war, he has written very little about the conflict between the States, nor does he talk much about it. The whole of his time is now given to the practice of law, and he is doing well in this profession. The narrative written by Captain Frayser follows: In August, 1864, orders were issued by the Federal Government that 600 Confederate officers confined at Fort Delaware should should be sent to Morris Island, near Charleston, S. C., and placed under fire. There had been sent previously fifty general and field officers to the same point for the same purpose.— But after some little delay these officers were exchanged. The 600 were somewhat elated at first, thinking they too would very soon be in Dixie, after leaving Fort Delaware. But in this they were