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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for August 5th, 1864 AD or search for August 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
een circumstances it was delayed until the 5th. This delay turned out to be fortunate, for on the 4th the Confederates were engaged in throwing more troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of which were captured. At 5:40 A. M. on the 5th of August, 1864, all the vessels outside of the bar, which were to participate in the battle, got underway in the following order, two abreast, lashed together: Brooklyn, Captain James Alden, with the Octorara, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Greene, on the aid aside his politeness under any circumstances) saw the white flag fluttering on the Tennessee, and stopped and backed his engines. Confederate ram Tennessee after her surrender to U. S. Squadron, Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. The Tennessee had done well, though she was not fought with the skill expected from Buchanan. The latter was wounded and had his leg so shattered that it had afterwards to be amputated. The Tennessee lost only two or three men killed,