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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for August 5th, 1864 AD or search for August 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
sed and two hundred and three had been built or were well advanced to completion. Over seven thousand five hundred volunteer officers from the merchant service, many of great ability and value, were employed, some of whom, at the end of the war, were taken into the regular service, rising to the highest ranks and filling with credit most important posts. The fight of the Monitor and Merrimac, the passage of the Mississippi forts (April 24, 1862), Port Hudson (March 14, 1863), Mobile (August 5, 1864), the fight between the Weehawken and Atlanta, the destruction of the Albemarle, and the duel of the Kearsarge and Alabama were notable battles, three of which rank in the forefront of naval actions in daring and in effect. It is not too much to say that Farragut's deeds in the Mississippi and at Mobile have not their parallel in The silenced guns at Fort Fisher--the final Link in the blockading chain, 1865. The wreckage in this picture of the dilapidated defenses of Fort Fisher m
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
re drying out also, as is her flying-jib. Her fore, main, and cross-jack yards are up in place; and not only are the awnings spread above the spar-deck, but the boat awnings are out also, showing that although it is early in the year it must have been a scorching day. Of this beautiful vessel Farragut has written that she was all that the heart could desire. He trusted himself to her in another memorable engagement when, lashed to her shrouds, he steamed past the forts in Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864, recking not of the Confederate torpedoes liberally planted in the harbor. January 20th, that must have rejoiced his heart. It is very evident that the preliminary plan had been well thought out. The details were left to his discretion. Sir: When the Hartford is in all respects ready for sea, you will proceed to the Gulf of Mexico with all possible despatch, and communicate with Flag-Officer W. W. McKean, who is directed by the inclosed despatch to transfer to you the command of
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
artford to T. W. Eastman, U. S. N., whose family has courteously allowed its reproduction here. Never was exhibited a more superb morale than on the Hartford as she steamed in line to the attack of Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay on the morning of August 5, 1864. Every man was at his station thinking his own thoughts in the suspense of that moment. On the quarterdeck stood Captain Percival Drayton and his staff. Near them was the chief-quartermaster, John H. Knowles, ready to hoist the signals thae section after another against a most obstinate defense. Colonel Lamb was badly wounded, as was General Whiting, the district commander, who was present but had The Confederate ironclad ram Tennessee Mobile Bay, on the morning of August 5, 1864, was the arena of more conspicuous heroism than marked any naval battle-ground of the entire war. Among all the daring deeds of that day stands out superlatively the gallant manner in which Admiral Franklin Buchanan, C. S. N., fought his vess
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
sunk off the harbor of Cherbourg, France, by U. S. sloop-of-war Kearsarge, Capt. Winslow. 70 of the Confed. crew were taken on board the Kearsarge, and 115 reached England and France. 3 persons only were wounded on the Kearsarge. The Kickapoo A forerunner of the new navy the Kickapoo on the Mississippi: one of the five river monitors built on Admiral Porter's enthusiastic recommendation, after he had officially examined the original Ericsson Monitor in 1861. August, 1864. August 5, 1864. Great battle at the entrance of Mobile Bay. The Confed. ram Tennessee captured after one of the fiercest naval battles on record. In the night, the Confederates evacuated and blew up Fort Powell. The monitor Tecumseh was blown up by a Confed. torpedo. August 6, 1864. Adml. Farragut shelled Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay. August 8, 1864. Surrender of Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay, to Adml. Farragut and Gen. Granger. August 23, 1864. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, surrender