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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for August 5th, 1864 AD or search for August 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 7 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
Massacre at)April 12, 1864 Wilderness (Va.)May 5 and 6, Spottsylvania Court-House (Va.)May 7-12, 1864 Resaca (Ga.)May 14 and 15, Bermuda HundredMay 10, 1864 New Hope Church (Ga.)May 25, 1864 Cold Harbor (Va.)June 1-3, 1864 Petersburg (Va.; Smith's Attack)June 16, 1864 Weldon Road (Va.)June 21 and 22, Kenesaw (Ga.)June 27, 1864 Peach-tree Creek (Ga.)July 20, 1864 Decatur (Ga.)July 22, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.)July 28, 1864 Petersburg (Va. ; Mine Explosion)July 30, 1864 Mobile BayAug. 5, 1864 Jonesboro (Ga.)Aug. 31 and Sept. 1, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.; Captured)Sept. 2, 1864 Winchester (Va.)Sept. 19, 1864 Fisher's Hill (Va.)Sept. 22, 1864 Allatoona Pass (Ga.)Oct. 6, 1864 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Oct. 27, 1864 Franklin (Tenn.)Nov. 30, 1864 Fort McAllister (Ga.)Dec. 14, 1864 Nashville (Tenn.)Dec. 15 and 16, Fort Fisher (N. C.; First Attack on)Dec. 24 and 25, Fort Fisher (N. C.; Capture of)Jan. 15, 1865 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Feb. 5, 1865 Averasboro (N. C.)Mar. 16, 1865 Bentonvil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- (search)
Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- Naval officer; born in Bradford, Vt., Aug. 10, 1843; was Charles Edgar Clark. trained in the naval academy in 1860-63, becoming ensign in the latter year. In 1863-65 he served on the sloop Ossipee, and participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, and the bombardment of Fort Morgan, Aug. 23. He was promoted lieutenant in 1867; lieutenantcommander in 1868; commander in 1881; and captain, June 21, 1896; and was given command of the Monterey. He held this post till March, 1898, when he was given command of the battle-ship Oregon, then at San Francisco, under orders to hurry her around Cape Horn to the vicinity of Cuba. He made the now famous run of 14,000 miles to Key West in sixty-five days, arriving at his destination on May 26. This was the longest and quickest trip of any battle-ship afloat. Despite her long voyage, the Oregon immediately joined Admiral Sampson's squadron. Captain Clark's excellent discipline was evident in the effec
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craven, Tunis Augustus MacDONOUGHonough 1813- (search)
Craven, Tunis Augustus MacDONOUGHonough 1813- Naval officer; born in Portsmouth, N. H., Jan. 11, 1813; entered the United States navy as midshipman in February, 1829. He was commissioned lieutenant in 1841, and made commander in 1861. In command of the iron-clad Tecumseh, he perished when she was blown up by a torpedo in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, he then holding the rank of commodore.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drayton, Percival, 1812-1865 (search)
Drayton, Percival, 1812-1865 Naval officer; born in South Carolina, Aug. 25, 1812; entered the navy as a midshipman in 1827; was promoted lieutenant in 1838; took part in the Paraguay expedition in 1858; commanded the monitor Passaic in the bombardment of Fort McAllister, and Farragut's flag-ship, the Hartford, in the battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864; and afterwards became chief of the bureau of navigation. He died in Washington, D. C., Aug. 4, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mobile, Ala. (search)
tion of the Alabama (q. v.), it was determined to seal up the ports of Mobile and Wilmington against English blockade-runners. These were the only ports then open to them. Admiral Farragut was sent for that purpose to the entrance of Mobile Bay, 30 miles below the city of Mobile, with a fleet of eighteen vessels, four of them iron-clad, while a co-operating land force, 5,000 strong, under Gen. Gordon Granger (q. v.), was sent from New Orleans to Dauphin Island. Farragut entered the bay Aug. 5, 1864. That entrance is divided into two passages by Dauphin Island. On the eastern side of this island was Fort Gaines, commanding the main entrance; and southeasterly from it was Fort Morgan, a still stronger work, with a light-house near it. These forts the Confederates had well earned and manned, and within the bay lay a Confederate flotilla under Admiral Buchanan. His flag-ship was the Tennessee, a powerful ram, and it was accompanied by three ordinary gunboats. Farragut lashed his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Ezra's Church, Ga.......July 28, 1864 Chambersburg, Pa., raided and mostly burned......July 30, 1864 Unsuccessful mine explosion under a Confederate fort, near Petersburg, Va., conducted by General Burnside......July 30, 1864 Confederate steamer Tallahassee, built in England, destroys many United States merchantmen......July–August, 1864 Successful attack on the harbor of Mobile; Forts Gaines, Morgan, and Powell captured by fleet under Farragut and land forces under Granger......Aug. 5-22, 1864 Maj.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan appointed to the Army of the Shenandoah......Aug. 7, 1864 English-built cruiser Georgia captured at sea by the Niagara......Aug. 15, 1864 General Grant seizes the Weldon Railroad......Aug. 18, 1864 Democratic National Convention meets at Chicago, Aug. 29; Horatio Seymour chosen president of the convention and platform adopted, Aug. 30. On first ballot for President, Gen. George B. McClellan, of New Jersey, has 174 votes (as revised and decl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama (search)
ded States meet at Montgomery ... Feb. 4, 1861 Adopt a provisional constitution ... Feb. 8, 1861 Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederacy at Montgomery ... Feb. 18, 1861 Seat of Confederate government removed from Montgomery to Richmond, Va ................... ....... July, 1861 There were liberated by the emancipation proclamation 435,132 slaves in Alabama ..................... Jan. 1, 1863 Confederate fleet defeated in Mobile Bay by Admiral Farragut ...... Aug. 5, 1864 [State furnishes to the Confederate service sixty-five regiments of infantry, twelve regiments of cavalry, and twenty-two batteries of artillery. Brewer's History of Alabama.] Mobile evacuated by Confederate forces ... April 12, 1865 State convention meets and annuls ordinance of secession ...... Sept. 25, 1865 New constitution adopted..Nov. 5: 1865 [This constitution was not ratified until November, 1875.] State admitted to a representation in Congress by act passed ov