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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for August 5th, 1864 AD or search for August 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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seven hundred in killed and wounded, many being left on the field. Some of the wounded were taken on board the Osage, and reported that they had been led to believe that the gunboat could easily be captured, and that their confidence in their leaders was so great that they would have followed anywhere. Commander Selfridge's report, with Admiral Porter's commentaries, may be found in the latter's Naval History of the Civil War, p. 514. In the remarkable naval battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, which was virtually a contest between the Confederate ram Tennessee, claimed as invulnerable, and the monitors, Admiral Porter attributes the highest merit of all to a Massachusetts officer, Commander (now admiral) Nicholson of the Manhattan, who alone pierced by his shot the formidable armor of the Tennessee. The charge for the fifteen-inch gun, as regulated by the Bureau of Ordnance, was only thirty-five pounds of powder; but Captain Nicholson nearly doubled it, using sixty-five pound