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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
No. 130. report of Col. Charles M. Lum, Tenth Michigan Infantry, of operations May 16-August 27. Hdqrs. Tenth regiment Michigan Vet. Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 8, 1864. The Tenth Regiment Michigan Veteran Infantry reached Resaca, Ga., on the 16th day of May, 1864, after having marched steadily for twenty days previous, and joined the First Brigade, Second Di vision, Fourteenth Army Corps, in the earlypart of the day, just as our division was starting for Rome, Ga., and, although the regiment had already marched five miles with heavy knapsacks, they kept pace readily with the column, which moved rapidly through Snake Creek Gap and toward Rome, a distance of fifteen miles, making twenty miles for the Tenth Michigan. Halted at 9 p.m. May 17, left camp at 6.30 a. m. and marched toward Rome, Ga. During the engagement which occurred near Rome, when the head of the column struck the rebel army defending the town, we were held in reserve, as our brigade was in rear of the
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
ers, 1869, page 231. (But this number, 30,152, does not include the deaths at Johnson's Island and some other places of confinement; neither does it include deaths from wounds in field hospitals.) But these pages have nothing to do with the prison question other than the statistics. The principal place of confinement for Union soldiers was at Andersonville, Ga. Out of 45,613 prisoners confined there, 12,912 died — or, 28 per cent. The greatest number present at any time was 33,114--on August 8, 1864. The greatest number of deaths in any one day was 127--on August 23, 1864. The daily average of deaths was 29 3/4. The largest military prison in the North was located at Elmira, N. Y. As at Andersonville, it consisted of an open stockade or prison pen. In it were confined 11,916 prisoners, of whom 2,994 died, or 25 per cent. The greatest mortality occurred in March, 1865, in which month 495 died at Elmira. Of the total number that died, 2,988 were buried in a field which has since
g of a tree, at Wild Cat, Ky. One Hundred and Sixty-second New York, Company E:--John Murphy; shot while endeavoring to escape the guard at New Orleans, April 5, 1863. Eighth New York, Company A:--A. Lohman; died of poison while on picket, by drinking from a bottle found at a deserted house. Thirtieth Wisconsin, Company C:--E. Olsen; killed in a draft riot, September 10, 1863, at New Lisbon, Wis. Eightieth New York, Company C:--John Edleman; killed by explosion of ammunition, August 8, 1864, at City Point, Va. Sixteenth Wisconsin, Company A:--George Halsey; drafted----; died February 27, 1865, Lynch Creek, S. C., of fatigue. One Hundred and Seventy-ninth New York, Company E:--Charles Clements; killed November 14, 1864, by falling from cars while on furlough. Thirty-ninth Illinois, Company D:--John Hays; killed in a row, July 4, 1865. Second Ohio, Company B:--George D. Wilson; executed by the Rebels at Atlanta, Ga., June 18, 1862; charged with being a bridge-burn
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
oes not exist anywhere, and we should be thankful for the manifold virtues our soldiers do pre-eminently possess. I see much to make me more contented in reading Napier, before referred to. After the taking of Badajos, the English allowed their own wounded to lie two days in the breach, without an attempt to carry them off.. This is the nation that now gives us very good lectures on humanity. As to old Wellington, I suspect he was about as savage an old brute as would be easy to find. August 8, 1864 What do you think of filling up with Germans? you ask. Now, what do you think of a man who has the toothache — a werry, werry big molar!--and who has not the courage to march up and have it out, but tries to persuade himself that he can buy some patent pain-killer that will cure him; when, in his soul, he knows that tooth has to come out? This is what I think of our good people (honest, doubtless) who would burden us with these poor, poor nigs, and these nerveless, stupid Germans.
West Gulf blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 8, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inform the Deron. U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: Agreeably to your order, I submit ord. U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: I respectfully beg leave to report. N. U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: In obedience to orders, I respectford. U. S. steamship Richmond, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: I have the honor respectfully to s S. Iron-clad Manhattan, Mobile Bay, Ala., August 8, 1864. sir: Of the six fifteen-inch projectilett. U. S. S. Metacomet, Bay of Mobile,Aug. 8, 1864. sir: Agreeably to your order of the sevG. Farragut.flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: In my despatch number three hundreWest Gulf blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 8, 1864. sir: I have to report that on the mornragut. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: I regret to inform the Department,
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
Admiral Porter's enthusiastic recommendation, after he had officially examined the original Ericsson Monitor in 1861. August, 1864. August 5, 1864. Great battle at the entrance of Mobile Bay. The Confed. ram Tennessee captured after one of the fiercest naval battles on record. In the night, the Confederates evacuated and blew up Fort Powell. The monitor Tecumseh was blown up by a Confed. torpedo. August 6, 1864. Adml. Farragut shelled Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay. August 8, 1864. Surrender of Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay, to Adml. Farragut and Gen. Granger. August 23, 1864. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, surrendered unconditionally. By its surrender, Federals captured 200 prisoners and 60 pieces of artillery. October, 1864. October 7, 1864. Confed. cruiser Florida captured at Bahia, Bay of San Salvador, Brazil, by U. S. S. Wachusett, Commander Collins. October 27, 1864. The Confed. ram Albemarle sunk by Lieut. Cushing, in the Roanoke River
wards, C. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Eggleston, B. B., Mar. 13, 1862. Eldridge, H. N., Mar. 13, 1865. Elliott, I. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Elliott, S. M., Mar. 13, 1865. Ellis, A. VanHorn, July 2, 1863. Ellis, Theo. G., Mar. 13, 1865. Elstner, G. R., Aug. 8, 1864. Elwell, J. J., Mar. 13, 1865. Ely, Ralph, April 2, 1865. Ely, Wm. C., April 13, 1865. Engleman, A., Mar. 13, 1865. Enochs, Wm. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Ent, W. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Enyart, D. A., Mar. 13, 1862. Erskine, Albert, Feb. 13, 1865.awyer, Frank, Mar. 13, 1865. Scates, W. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Schmitt, Wm. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Schneider, E. F., Mar. 13, 1865. Schofield, H., Mar. 13, 1865. Schofield, Geo. W., Jan. 26, 1865. Schwenk, S. K., July 24, 1865. Scribner, B. F., Aug. 8, 1864. Scott, Geo. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Scott, Rufus, Mar. 13, 1865. Seaver, Joel J., Mar. 13, 1865. Seawall, Thos. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Selfridge, J. L., Mar. 16, 1865. Serrell, Edw. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Sewall, F. D., July 21, 1865. Shaffer, G.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
nse, I received his apologies as if nothing had ever taken place, and he left me quite pleased. I hope the dear children will enjoy themselves at Cape May. I should be so happy if I could only be there with you, to indulge in those splendid sea baths and take our old walks on the beach. Well, let us keep up our spirits, have brave hearts, trust in God's mercy and goodness, and believe that so long as we try to do our duty all will be well in time. Headquarters army of the Potomac, August 8, 1864. Grant has not yet returned from Washington. It is reported he has gone to Harper's Ferry to see for himself how matters stand. This, and his not telegraphing for me, I think settle the question about my being transferred. August 9, 1864. I am delighted to see your letter is written in such good spirits, and am truly rejoiced to hear I have so many and such warm friends. The attempt to implicate me in the recent fiasco was truly ridiculous; still, the public must in time be in
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kentucky, 1864 (search)
ntry (Detachments). July 17-18: Scout from Columbus to HickmanTENNESSEE--7th Cavalry (Detachment). July 26-27: Exp. from Paducah to Haddix FerryILLINOIS--132d Infantry. UNITED STATES--8th Colored Heavy Arty. July 27: Skirmish near Haddix FerryILLINOIS--132d Infantry. UNITED STATES--8th Colored Heavy Arty. Aug. 1: Skirmish near BardstownKENTUCKY--35th Mounted Infantry (Co. "A"). Aug. 2: Skirmish near New HavenKENTUCKY--40th Infantry (Co. "C"). Aug. 7: Raid in Union CountyBy Guerrillas. Aug. 8: Skirmish, SalemKENTUCKY--48th Infantry. Aug. 14-15: Scout from Mayfield and SkirmishILLINOIS--3d Cavalry (Detachment). Aug. 16-22: Exp. from Mt. Vernon, Ind.,, into KentuckyINDIANA--32d and 46th Infantry (Non-Veterans); Indiana Legion, Cavalry, Arty. and Infantry Detachments. Aug. 17: Skirmish, White Oak SpringsINDIANA--32d and 46th Infantry (Non-Veterans), Detachments Indiana Legion. Aug. 18: Skirmish, Geiger's LakeINDIANA--32d and 46th Infantry (Non-Veterans), Detachments Indiana Legi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1864 (search)
"K," 2d Light Arty. (Section); 28th and 29th Infantry. UNITED STATES--6th Colored Heavy Arty.; 58th Colored Infantry. Union loss, 3 wounded. Aug. 7-9: Skirmishes, Tallahatchie RiverILLINOIS--2d, 3d, 6th, 7th and 9th Cavalry; Battery "K," 1st Light Arty.; 114th Infantry. INDIANA--7th Cavalry; 6th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 93d Infantry. IOWA--2d, 3d and 4th Cavalry; 12th and 35th Infantry. KANSAS--7th Cavalry. MINNESOTA--7th and 10th Infantry. MISSOURI--10th and 12th Cavalry; 33d Infantry. Aug. 8: Skirmish, Holly SpringsIOWA--3d Cavalry. Aug. 9: Skirmish, Hurricane CreekILLINOIS--3d, 6th, 7th and 9th Cavalry; Battery "K," 1st Light Arty. INDIANA--7th Cavalry. IOWA--2d, 3d and 4th Cavalry. KANSAS--7th Cavalry. MISSISSIPPI--1st Mounted Rifies. MISSOURI--10th and 12th Cavalry. NEW JERSEY--2d Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--19th Cavalry. Aug. 9: Skirmish, OxfordILLINOIS--3d, 6th, 7th and 9th Cavalry; Battery "K," 1st Light Arty. INDIANA--7th Cavalry. IOWA--2d, 3d and 4th Cavalry. KANSAS--7th Ca
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