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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 16 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 3 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 10th, 1864 AD or search for August 10th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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rt of the Federal Government to violate its own agreement, the Confederate authorities, moved by the sufferings of the brave men who are so unjustly held in Northern prisons, determined to abate their fair demands, and accordingly, on the tenth of August, 1864, I addressed the following communication to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange, in charge of the flag-of-truce boat, which on the same day I delivered to him at Varina, on James River: war Department Richmond, Va, AugAugust 10, 1864 Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: You have several times proposed to me to exchange the prisoners respectively held by the two belligerents, officer for officer, and man for man. The same offer has also been made by the other officials having charge of matters connected with the exchange of prisoners. This proposal has heretofore been declined by the Confederate authorities, they insisting upon the terms of the cartel, which required the delivery of the e
rt of the Federal Government to violate its own agreement, the Confederate authorities, moved by the sufferings of the brave men who are so unjustly held in Northern prisons, determined to abate their fair demands, and accordingly, on the tenth of August, 1864, I addressed the following communication to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange, in charge of the flag-of-truce boat, which on the same day I delivered to him at Varina, on James River: war Department Richmond, Va, AugAugust 10, 1864 Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: You have several times proposed to me to exchange the prisoners respectively held by the two belligerents, officer for officer, and man for man. The same offer has also been made by the other officials having charge of matters connected with the exchange of prisoners. This proposal has heretofore been declined by the Confederate authorities, they insisting upon the terms of the cartel, which required the delivery of the e
gerated. The day when we lay hold upon that, that day the rebels, if they have not already left it, must lay aside their hopes of holding Atlanta. Garrard's cavalry hold the Augusta railroad in their possession, and, with this last one in our grasp, we throttle them as inevitably as death. Already our batteries could knock the trains from the track, if only they could find a hillock which would raise them above the interminable trees. This they cannot for the present. near Atlanta, August 10, 1864. The movements of the enemy during the past few days are calculated to impress one with the belief that Hood's policy is to guard the railroad until the last moment, and, when it has been struck by our prolongated lines, suddenly turn upon us, and, by massing upon a weak point, break it and throw us on the defensive. Since Friday last our line has been slowly reaching out parallel with the line of railway, and one division of the Twenty-third corps has swung round upon and struck th
Cedar Creek October 19 19 91 121 231 Cavalry Opequan September 19 65 267 109 441   Tom's Creek October 9 9 48   57   Cedar Creek October 19 25 139 50 214   Twenty-six other engagements   355 2,363 487 3,205 Total     454 2,817 646 3,917 Grand total     1,938 11,893 3,121 16,952 Official: T. W. C. Moore, A. A. G Report of Property Captured and Destroyed from the Enemy by the Middle Military Division, Major-General P. H. Sheridan commanding, during the campaign commencing August 10, 1864, and ending November 16, 1864. no. Of pieces artillery. no. of caissons. no. of limbers. no. of forges. no. of battery wagons. rounds of artillery ammunition. no. of Army wagons. no. of ambulances. no. of Medical wagons. sets of harness. sets of horse equipments. no. of battle flags. no. of small arms. rounds of small arm ammunition. no. of horses. no. of mules. no. of flour Mills. no. of woollen Mills. no. of saw Mills. no. of powder Mills. no. of saltpetre works.