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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 316 316 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 5 5 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for September, 1864 AD or search for September, 1864 AD in all documents.

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nce in the far West that he regarded slavery as in no sense the cause of the sectional troubles of 1860-61. It was all the result, he maintained, of the machinations of unscrupulous politicians scheming for power, working upon a restless people who were suffering from an overdose of Democracy. It is clear that Sherman, while appreciating both the Northern Sherman's leaders in the Atlanta campaign the first of five groups of leaders who made possible Sherman's laconic message of September, 1864: Atlanta is ours and fairly won James D. Morgan, leader of a division in Palmer's Corps. R. M. Johnson, leader of a division in the Fourteenth Corps. John Newton led the Second division of the Fourth Corps. Alpheus S. Williams, leader of a division under General Joseph Hooker. Edward M. McCook, dashing leader of a Cavalry division in front of Atlanta. Wager Swayne, originally Colonel of the 43d Ohio, brevetted Major-General. and the Southern points of view, did not
went to the Civil War as lieutenant-colonel of the Ninth New Jersey Infantry. He became a colonel and had a brigade in the Department of North Carolina, where, after being made brigadier-general of volunteers, he had a division in the Eighteenth Army Corps. Later, he had charge of the District of Beaufort and the defenses of New Berne and at Newport News. On May 16, 1864, at the head of a brigade he was captured at Drewry's Bluff. He had temporary command of the Eighteenth Corps in September, 1864, and was temporary commander of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps, January-February, 1865. He resigned from tle service in May, 1865, and died in Philadelphia, January 14, 1896. Federal generals--no. 17 New York (continued) Nelson Taylor, originally Colonel of the 72d regiment. John H. H. Ward, originally Colonel of the 38th regiment. Daniel Ullmann, originally Colonel of the 78th regiment. Adolph von Steinwehr, originally Colonel of the 29th Infantry. Emory Upto
. Jackson, in May, 1862. The next year (February, 1863), he was made major-general. He had a division in the Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, and in September, 1864, was assigned to the division of the Second Corps, Army of Tennessee. He died in Richmond, Virginia, March 2, 1873. Army of the Potomac On May 24, 1861 August. He was then made major-general and had a division in Bragg's army and was given a temporary corps at Chickamauga. He was made lieutenant-general in September, 1864, and was commander in several districts of the Trans-Mississippi Department. He was elected governor of Kentucky in 1887, and in 1896 was the candidate of thippi near New Orleans in July, but was driven back by Weitzel and Franklin. The following year he was instrumental in defeating the Red River expedition. In September, 1864, he was sent to command the Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, and surrendered to Major-General Canby, May 4, 1865. He died in New York C