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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 37 37 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for September 1st, 1864 AD or search for September 1st, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
th of bomb-proofs and magazines, with passages between. How far towards Cemetery Ridge, that is to say, west of the Confederate works, did the Federal forces advance at any time during their four hours occupation of these works, is a question which naturally arises, and was asked several of the witnesses in the official investigation made by the Federal government. Extracts from some of the testimony before the court of inquiry, held at the headquarters of General Hancock on the 1st of September, 1864, will give us some light upon this point: Brigadier-General S. G. Griffin, who commanded a brigade of Potter's division, on the stand: Ques.—Did your command go beyond the Crater? Ans.—It did. Ques.—About how far? Ans.—I should judge about two hundred yards. It might be more, or it might be less. It could not have been much less, however; that is as near as I can judge. Colonel H. G. Thomas, commanding the Second brigade of Ferrero's (colored) division, on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5 (search)
en, which would guard the river better than the long line of dispersed guns and entrenchments and troops which extended above and below Vicksburg for more than twenty miles. While commanding the Department of the Gulf I occasionally sent him supplies of provisions, troops, and some siege-pieces, which he mounted on the works of Atlanta, declaring thereby his intention to keep that place. After his removal from command I received this very interesting letter from him: Macon, Ga., September 1, 1864. My dear Maury: I have been intending ever since my arrival at this place to pay a part of the epistolary debt I owe you. But you know how lazy it makes one to have nothing to do, and so with the hot weather we have been enduring here I have absolutely devoted myself to idleness. I have been disposed to write more particularly of what concerns myself—to explain to you as far as practicable the operations for which I was laid on the shelf, for you are one of the last whose unfavo