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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 296 296 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for October, 1864 AD or search for October, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
him of this fact, which was probably the chief reason why he did not again venture out. Under these circumstances, Lieutenant W. B. Cushing was offered a further opportunity to distinguish himself — an offer he at once accepted. He was sent to New York, to superintend the fitting out of three torpedo steam-launches, arranged according to the plans of Chief Engineer W. W. W. Wood and Assistant-Engineer G. W. Lay, which proved to be all that were claimed for them. About the middle of October, 1864, the launches were ready, and Cushing got away with them from the New York Navy Yard. Cushing was not so well adapted for the command of a flotilla, even of steam-launches, as he was of a single vessel. One of his torpedo-launches sank soon after he started, and another was run ashore and surrendered to the Confederates in Chesapeake Bay, while Cushing, steaming through a rough sea, safely reached Hampton Roads, and reported to Rear-Admiral Porter, then on board his flag-ship, the Ma
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
re of Wilmington, N. C. firing national salutes. additional reports of officers. operations after capture of Fort Fisher. Confederate gun-boats and their movements in James River. Miscellaneous operations of North Atlantic Squadron, from October, 1864, to April, 1865. The reader can imagine the disappointment in the North when the failure to take Fort Fisher was announced, and the numerous reports that were flying about must have considerably mystified the public. One said the whole excinity; so they quietly dispersed, and all that portion of the Confederacy fell permanently into the hands of the Unionists. But for the unfortunate sinking of the Otsego and the Bazley, all the operations of the North Atlantic squadron from October, 1864, to April, 1865, would have been crowned with success. Although the area of operations in and around Plymouth was not a large one, what thrilling incidents had occurred in that small space! First: the capture and fortification of Plymouth
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
junction with the Army. destroying the Confederate batteries on the Tennessee River. General George H. Thomas compliments the Navy. General Hood's retreat and losses. the Confederate ram Webb. gallantry of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch and his men. end of the Confederate Navy in the Mississippi region. surrender of Confederate property at Shreveport. list of vessels and officers of the Mississippi Squadron, 1865. Acting-rear-admiral. S. P. Lee, who followed Rear-Admiral Porter in October, 1864, in the command of the Mississippi Squadron, was not fortunate on his arrival in the West. On the 4th of November, Admiral Lee reports the loss of the tin-clad gun-boat Undine in an engagement with the Confederates on the Tennessee. The enemy had seven pieces of artillery against the gun-boat's four. On the 4th of November the light-draft gun-boats Towah, Key West and Elfin had a severe engagement with the enemy, lasting several hours, when Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. M. King,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
ress! The case of the Tuscaloosa, already mentioned, is too glaring to need discussion. Towards the close of the civil war the Confederate Navy List must have presented a curious aspect, for one day a vessel would figure as a blockade-runner under the British flag, and the next she was a Confederate cruiser; but, strange to say, the British colonial courts could not find any law for interfering with such vessels. The blockade-runner Edith escaped from Wilmington, N. C., one night in October, 1864, under the name of the Confederate States steamer Chickamauga. She was armed with a 64-pounder and a 32-pounder, and steering north along the coast destroyed several unfortunate vessels; when, her whereabouts becoming known, she was compelled to run the gauntlet into Wilmington again, and resumed her former character. What particular object it was proposed to accomplish by such proceedings as those of the Chickamauga is hard to conceive, for at that stage of the civil war a cruise agai