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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 301 301 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for November, 1864 AD or search for November, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
inia the supply of breadstuff was practically exhausted. The negro field-hands were absconding for fear of being employed in the army, and were taking refuge in the Union lines, while Sherman's march through the South had cut off all supplies of grain or cattle from that region. It may be imagined, then, how important it was for the Confederate armies that the blockade-runners should now and then obtain safe entrance into the Southern harbors with their military supplies. As late as November, 1864, President Davis applied to the Commissary-General to ascertain how many rations there were on hand, to feed not only the army at Richmond, but the other forces in the field, and was informed that there was a very alarming state of affairs in that Department; that Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi were the only States where there was an accumulation, and that the Confederate Army was at that time being subsisted from these States. The Commissary of Georgia sent dispatches that he could
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
d. Charleston evacuated. Isolation of the Confederacy. naval officers commended. Confederate vessels captured. ingenious methods used by Confederates to prevent Union vessels from penetrating the inner harbor. plans of forts along the rivers. Georgetown, S. C., occupied. the flag-ship Harvest Moon sunk by torpedoes. Admiral Dahlgren relieved. complimentary letter from Secretary of the Navy, list of vessels and officers of South Atlantic Squadron, 1865. In the latter part of November, 1864, Rear-Admiral Dahlgren received information that General Sherman had reached Milledgeville and was about to march upon Savannah. He accordingly entered into an arrangement with General Foster to co-operate with Sherman in case the latter might require assistance. It was decided to form a naval brigade, to be furnished with two field-howitzer batteries of four guns each. All the forces that could be spared from the vessels on blockade were withdrawn, and the night of November 28th wa