Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 16th, 1864 AD or search for November 16th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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five miles from Jonesboro. Upon the evening of the fifteenth, the command went into camp; Kilpatrick near Jonesboro, the heads of the two infantry columns near Stockbridge. Kilpatrick met the enemy's cavalry skirmishers near East-Point, and drove them before him to the crossing of Flint River. Osterhaus met them not far from Rough and Ready, and again in the vicinity of Stockbridge. He found encamped at that point Lewis's brigade of rebel cavalry, reported nine hundred strong. November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, setting fire to the bridge. Some mounted infantry that he had in advance drove them from the bridge in time to put out the fire, and save every thing but the planking. The bridge was immediately repaired, and detained the column just forty minutes. General Kilpatrick crossed the Flint River at the bridge near Jon
November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, setting fire to the bridge. Some mounted infantry that he had in advance drove them from the bridge in time to put out the fire, and save every thing but the planking. The bridge was immediately repaired, and detained the column just forty minutes. General Kilpatrick crossed the Flint River at the bridge near Jonesboro, at seven A. M. Finding the enemy had left that place, he followed him to Lovejoy, where he occupied the strong position there, having two brigades of cavalry and two pieces of artillery, and holding the old rebel works. The General charged the works with dismounted cavalry, and carried them, driving back the enemy. Subsequently, the enemy's. artillery was overtaken by another charging column, and captured. He drove the enemy beyond Bear Station, capturing over fifty prisone
les captured, 60 head; number cattle captured, 250 head; number negroes that followed the column, 40; number pounds corn captured, 62,000; number pounds rice captured, 18,000; number pounds oats captured, 14,000; number pounds fodder captured, 13,084; number pounds hay captured, 5133. From the organization of the brigade up to the fall of Savannah, the men were issued five (5) days' rations. The rest of the time they subsisted off the country. The Second brigade was organized November sixteenth, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia, and assigned to the First division, Fourteenth army corps, with which it marched to this place, a distance of two hundred and ninety-three miles, passing in its route through Decatur, Lithonia, Congers, Covington, Sandersville, Louisville, Milledgeville, and striking the railroad again at Lumpkins Station. I have the honor, Captain, to be your obedient servant, J. H. Brigham, Lieutenant-Colonel Sixty-ninth Ohio Commanding. To G. W. Smith, Captain and A. A.
nt of the train was not yet regulated ; halted at half-past 3 o'clock P. M. on the right of the road for dinner ; at about five o'clock moved out again, passing through Decatur about dusk; after the corps had passed through, many of the buildings were wrapped in flames. November 16th. Our march continued all night; went into camp about eight miles east of Stone Mountain; forage was nearly all taken by the forage forces of previous expeditions; company A was detailed as foragers November sixteenth, 1864. November 17th. There was but little system in the management of the immense wagon-train and troops, as we marched all day without stopping for dinner or supper. November 18th, marched till half-past 3 o'clock P. M.; halted and bivouacked for the night, having passed through Social Circle at noon, halting one hour for dinner; here we found plenty of forage for both soldier and stock ; after dinner moved out again; reached the railroad at Rutledge Station, where the duty of de
ntal or wanton fire and destruction, all buildings not designated to be destroyed. This called for the entire and united efforts of the whole command during the days and nights of the thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, and part of the sixteenth of November, 1864; and considering so great a number of buildings were destroyed, and very many by fire, in the compact part of the city, at a time when many stragglers were passing through the town, and when the excitement of so great a conflagration wocum, commanding left wing army of Georgia, to remain in the city with my command until all the troops had passed, and then join the rear of the Fourteenth corps, Brevet-General J. C. Davies commanding, which I did at five o'clock P. M., November sixteenth, 1864; remaining with that corps, and marching in its rear, until the afternoon of the twenty-first November, at five o'clock, when, at Eatonton Mills, Georgia, I left it, and joined the Twentieth corps, at Milledgeville, Georgia, at eleven o'