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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, chapter 14 (search)
Strong, Civil Life, Oct. 21, 1862; Lt.-Col., July 28, 1863. Chas. T. Trowbridge, Promotion, Aug. 11, 1863; Lt.-Col., Dec. 9, 1864. H. A. Whitney, Promotion, Dec. 9, 1864; Mustered out, &c. Surgeons. Seth Rogers, Civil Life, Dec. 2, 1862; Resigned, Dec. 21, 1863. Wm. B. Crandall, 29th Ct., June 8, 1864; Mustered out, &c. Assistant surgeons. J. M. Hawks, Civil Life, Oct. 20, 1862; Surgeon 3d S. C. Vols., Oct. 29 1863. Thos. T. Minor, 7th Ct., Jan. 8, 1863; Resigned, Nov. 21, 1864. E. S. Stuard, Civil Life, Sept. 4, 1865; Mustered out, &c. Chaplain. Jas. H. Fowler, Civil Life, Oct. 24, 1862; Mustered out, &c. Captains. Chas. T. Trowbridge, N. Y. Vol. Eng., Oct. 13, 1862; Major, Aug. 11, 1863. Wm. James, 100th Pa., Oct. 13, 1862; Mustered out, &c. W. J. Randolph, 100th Pa., Oct. 13, 1862; Resigned, Jan. 29, 1864. H. A. Whitney, 8th Me., Oct. 13, 1862; Major, Dec. 9, 1864. Alex. Heasley, 100th Pa., Oct. 13, 1862; Killed at Augusta, Ga.,
their gallant bearing in many a hard-fought battle. Readily will we receive those who choose to remain among us ; and in holy ground take care of her honoured dead, who so freely gave their lives for Southern rights. The Potomac may seem to some the natural boundary between North and South ; but it is hard to make up one's mind yet to the entire surrender of our sister State; and if we could, gladly would we hope for Maryland, even as we hope for the Southern Confederacy herself. November 21st, 1864. We attended hospital services yesterday as usual. There are few patients, and none are very ill. On Friday night a most unexpected death took place, under very painful circumstances. A young adjutant lost his life by jumping out of a window at the head of his bed, about ten feet from the ground. His attendants were a sister, brother, and two servants. His suffering with a wound in his foot had been so intense that he would not allow any one to touch it except the ward-master,
see page 608.] New York, Nov. 8, 1864. Colonel J. E. Mulford, Assistant agent of exchange, Fortress Monroe, Va.: Start immediately with the Atlantic and Baltic. It is by order of the Secretary of War. Do not yield the point to anything but armed force and let General Shepley have sufficient force to meet even that. B. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. [no. 11. see page 609.] Office Assistant agent for exchange of prisoners, flag of truce steamer New York, Savannah River, Nov. 21, 1864. Major-General Butler, commissioner for exchange : General.--I have the honor to inform you that I have up to the present time received over three thousand of our men. Their physical condition is rather better than I expected, but their personal is worse than anything I have ever seen — filth and rags. It is a great labor to cleanse and clothe them, but I am fairly at work and will progress as rapidly as possible. I have much to say, but have little time for writing now. I have got
he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the track. The road was struck in two or three places by the cavalry, beside the above, and a train of cars burned. It rained hard during the entire night. November 21, 1864. The cavalry took up an advance position covering all roads debouching from Macon. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made
November 21, 1864. The cavalry took up an advance position covering all roads debouching from Macon. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made a parallel road into Gordon. Only the division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first.
ty just at daylight. Annexed, I have the honor to forward a list of casualties for the period herein mentioned. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas M. Walker, Lieut.-Colonel Commanding One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers. Captain Oliver T. May, A. A. A. Gen., Third Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps. List of casualties in the One Hundred and Eleventh regiment Pennsylvania veteran volunteers, from November sixteenth to November twenty-first, 1864, inclusive: Thomas Brown, private, company B, wounded in face, slightly. Brigadier-General Ward's Report. headquarters Third division, Twentieth army corps, Cheves' house, South-Carolina, January 4, 1865. Lieutenant-Colonel H. W. Perkins, Assistant Adjutant-General, Twentieth Army Corps: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of this division, from the occupation of Atlanta, September second, 1864, to the occupation of Savannah, Decemb
 1Supposed captured. 8David Scott,CorporalD1   At Waynesboro, Ga., while carrying brigade-colors, Dec. 4, 1864. 9Patrick Kenyon,PrivateE 1  At Waynesboro, December 4, 1864. 10Frederick Groff,PrivateE   1Captured by enemy while on picket, November 21, 1864 11John Smith,PrivateE   1Captured December 9, 1864. 12Zach S. Buckman,PrivateF  1 Near Macon, Ga., November 21, 1864. 13Henry Owens,PrivateF  1 Near Waynesboro, December 4, 1864. 14Jacob Lamb,CorporalF 1  Near Waynesboro, December 4, 18November 21, 1864. 13Henry Owens,PrivateF  1 Near Waynesboro, December 4, 1864. 14Jacob Lamb,CorporalF 1  Near Waynesboro, December 4, 1864. 15George Ventioneer,PrivateF   1Captured while on picket. 16Joseph Drew,PrivateG 1  Near Waynesboro, December 4, 1864. 17Thomas A. Smith,PrivateG   1Captured near Jacksonville, Ga. 18John B. Doctor,PrivateH 1  Near Louisville, Ga., November 28, 1864. 19Jacob Meier,PrivateH   1November 24, 1864. 20Stephen T. Cooper,SergeantH   1December 7, 1864. 21Wm. N. Irvine,CorporalH   1December 7, 1864. 22Richard Gifford,CorporalH   1December 7, 1864.
rly's command. Losses: Union, 84 wounded, 100 missing; Confed., 150 killed, wounded, and missing. November 13, 1864: Bull's Gap., Tenn. Union, 8th, 9th, and 13th Tenn. Cav.; Confed., advance of Gen. Hood's army. Losses: Union, 5 killed, 36 wounded, 200 missing; Confed. No record found. November 17, 1864: Bermuda hundred, Va. Union, 209th Pa.; Confed., troops of Gen. Lee's army. Losses: Union, 10 wounded, 120 missing; Confed., 10 wounded. November 21, 1864: Griswoldville, Ga. Union, Walcutt's Brigade First Division, Fifteenth Corps, and First Brigade Third Division Cav.; Confed., Gen. Gustavus W. Smith's Georgia Militia. Losses: Union, 13 killed, 69 wounded; Confed., 5 killed, 472 wounded, 2 missing. November 22, 1864: Rood's Hill, Va. Union, Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 18 killed, 52 wounded; Confed. No record found. November 24, 1864: Lawrenceburg, Campbellville, and
All correspondence in regard to prisoners passed through his hands, and whatever uniformity there was in the conditions in Federal prisons was largely due to this fact, as he established rules for the guidance of the commandants, and provided for an elaborate system of inspections and reports. The rules, unfortunately, were not interpreted uniformly by the officers in charge, and he was hampered in administration by political influences. The Confederacy created no such office until November 21, 1864, when General Winder was appointed. After his death in February, 1865, General G. J. Pillow served for a few days, and was then succeeded by General Daniel Ruggles. In the last days of the Confederacy it was too late to reduce chaotic conditions to order. When prisoners were kept chiefly in Richmond, General Winder had command, and had an undefined supervision over those outside. When the greater number of prisoners was sent South, he was placed in command of the prisons in Georgia
reated considerable feeling against him. In 1864, after the largest number of enlisted men had been transferred to Andersonville and many of the officers to Macon, he was placed in charge of all the prisons in Alabama and Georgia. Finally, November 21, 1864, he was made commissary-general of prisoners east of the Mississippi River. He died February 7, 1865, it is said from disease contracted while visiting the prison stockade at Florence. General Winder's character has been the subject of muthe city of Richmond. Later he was placed in charge of all the prisons of Richmond, with a shadowy authority over those outside. After the prisoners were sent South, he was assigned to command the prisons in Alabama and Georgia. Finally, November 21, 1864, he was made commissary-general of prisoners east of the Mississippi. Evidence shown by his official papers is contradictory. Congressman Ely, who had been a prisoner in Liggon's factory, calls him the kind-hearted general, but Colonel
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