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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 509 509 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for December, 1864 AD or search for December, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
anks of the White River while the gun-boats were so active, transferred their operations to some other quarter. With the exception of some trouble with the guerillas up the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, the operations for the year 1864 ended favorably for the Union cause, as far as the Navy was concerned. The Confederates continued to show themselves in Kentucky and Tennessee, however, and sometimes took advantage of transports that were not convoyed by gun-boats. Even as late as December, 1864, there was no diminution of zeal and energy on the part of the enemy, though they must have seen by that time that the Confederacy was doomed. An artillery company would sometimes travel for miles just for the pleasure of firing a few shots into a gunboat or transport. There was not cavalry enough on the Federal side to pursue these raiders; and, if an expedition was organized for that purpose, it generally consisted of an army contingent in transports convoyed by gunboats. Someti
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
osure, who, but for the war, might be living to-day. Increase of the Navy and improvements in naval ships up to December, 1864. As the war progressed, it became evident that the Federal Government should not only build vessels for blockading the course of construction, since March 4, 1861: General exhibit of the Navy, including vessels under construction, Dec., 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 113 Screw steamers especially constructed for naval pur of the Navy, December, 1863 and 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 671 Total navy, December, 1864 4,610 510,396 588 Total navy, December, 1863 4,443 467,967 83 Actual increase for the year 167 42,429 26 Totwreck, in battle, capture, &c., during the year 146 13,084 109 Actual addition to the navy from December, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw sl
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
ssels. Owing to the vigilance of the authorities, who in this instance were upon the alert to prevent a violation of the neutrality laws, the Tallahassee was unable to obtain coal or othersupplies, and was obliged to return to Wilmington. In November this vessel made another attempt, under the name of the Olustee, and took a few prizes, but, returning to Wilmington, assumed her old character of merchant vessel and blockade-runner. She received the appropriate name of Chameleon, and in December, 1864, went to sea under the command of Captain John Wilkinson, of the Confederate Navy, with the object of returning from Bermuda laden with provisions for the Confederate army. Although the Governor of Bermuda was duly apprised of the character of the Chameleon, he expressed himself as satisfied that she had been sufficiently whitewashed to be admitted as a merchant vessel. The cargo was sold, a supply of stores laid in, and the vessel returned to the Confederacy, only to find that Wilming