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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The relative strength of the armies of Generals Lee and Grant. (search)
e, is not to be wondered at, but when the report of Mr. Edwin M. Stanton, the United States Secretary of War, made at the opening session of Congress for the years 1865-6, is critically examined, it will be regarded as most surprising that General Badeau should have committed such gross blunders in regard to the strength of Grant'imate which I had made of his force, in a published letter written from Havana in December, 1865, and in my published account of my own operations for the years 1864-5--which was 50,000--exceeded the actual efficient strength of his army. The returns of the Army of Northern Virginia, which are in what is called the Archive offic44135,805  AugustR. E. Lee44,24758,984146,838  OctoberR. E. Lee62,87582,535177,103  NovemberR. E. Lee69,29087,860181,826  DecemberR. E. Lee66,53379,318155,772 1865--JanuaryR. E. Lee53,44569,673441,627  FebruaryR. E. Lee59,09473,349160,411 This table, which must be understood as giving the returns at the close of the mon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
onel Charles Marshall in 1874, and Major John W. Daniel in 1875. The next annual reunion will take place in Richmond, on the first of November. The chosen orator is Captain W. Gordon McCabe, who will discuss as his subject, Petersburg in 1864-5. There will also be a banquet. Applicants for membership in this association will be furnished with proper blanks on addressing either of the secretaries. The charges are: annual membership fee, $1; certificate of membership (beautifully engrascaloosa, Alabama--General R. E. Rodes' reports of the Gettysburg campaign, Chancellorsville, Seven Pines, and the First Maryland campaign. From Mrs. A. J. Graves, Baltimore--Fifteen scrap books filled with newspaper clippings for the years 1860-65, very carefully selected and arranged in chronological order. From Rev. Geo. W. Peterkin, Baltimore--Roster of the artillery of Army of Northern Virginia, copied from an original morning return which came into his possession while serving on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
, and in nearly every instance our archives afforded the information sought. Several gentlemen engaged in writing important parts of the history of our struggle for constitutional freedom, have acknowledged valuable assistance received from us, and have signified their purpose of consulting our archives more freely in the future. Indeed we have already on our shelves ample material for a true history of the war between the States, with the exception of the year 1864, and the early part of 1865. We have invaluable material for this latter period; but our collection is less complete for these years than any others, and we beg our friends who may have material which would throw light upon this part of the war to send it promptly forward to our office. We have not been in condition to purchase documents or Mss., but we have been highly gratified at the cheerful alacrity with which our patriotic people have given us material which no money could purchase. We have the promise of many
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
er to Meade.--Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. 1, p. 42. The Crater fight. Burns 13th, 1864.--Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 151. Immediately in rear of this e first day. Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 45. But the cautious Meade replieoped to do. --Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 169. which he thwarted by concently accurate.--Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 170. The conjuncture was stilox, U. S. A.--Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 79; Burnside's testimony--Ib., p.neral Warren--Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 166; General Hunt, pp. 98, 184; Daragraph, cf. Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, pp. 21, 92, 94, 96, 121, 157, 177, 2overed ways. Report on the Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, pp. 96, 228 (Meade's dispatch, 8 A, licit testimony, Report on Conduct of the War (1865), vol. i, p. 110. satisfied himself that an at[9 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
Diary of Captain Robert E. Park, Twelft Alabama regiment. [continued from November No.] January 1st, 1865 New Year's Day--The first day of 1865 is far from bright and cheerful; it is snowing, cold and windy. Our little band of Confederates remain closely in quarters, discussing the past and speculating on the future, now apparently dark and gloomy, of our sorely pressed county. Recently captured prisoners tell us of the great straits to which General Lee's army around Richmond has been reduced, of the long, thinly scattered line of soldiers, pale and worn by hunger and constant watching, and of the gloom and despondency enveloping the heroic citizens of the beleaguered Confederate capital. They confirm also the disheartening accounts of the dastardly conduct of Sherman in my native State, dear old Georgia, of his expelling the citizeus of Atlanta from their homes, and the destruction of the entire city, and of his bloodthirsty letter to Honorable J. M. Calhoun, Mayor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ch edition of my work on the Civil War in North America. The English and French critics having commended my little work, more highly perhaps than it merits, I am emboldened to place it upon the table of the Southern Historical Society as a small token of my gratitude to the valiant and hospitable people of the South. I regret one error which crept into my book, in a way which I will explain. I left the South in September 1863, and was obliged to take the events of the campaign of 1864-65 from foreign authors. I studied Fletcher and Chesney (not relying on Northern authors), and here I found a misrepresentation of the conduct of the troops of General Early, which I received as true, and repeated on page 290 of my book. As soon as I received more accurate information (by the favor of General Early, who was so kind as to send me his very interesting Memoirs), I wrote to the French editor, M. J. Dumaine, at Paris, begging him to omit at once the passage criticising General Early