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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hatcher's Run-telegram from General Lee. (search)
Battle of Hatcher's Run-telegram from General Lee. [Received at Richmond, Va., February 6th, 11 o'clock P. M., 1865, by telegraph from Headquarters A. N. Va.] To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-and Inspector-General: The enemy moved in strong force yesterday to Hatcher's Run. Part of his infantry, with Gregg's cavalry, crossed and proceeded on the Vaughan road — the infantry to Cattail creek, the cavalry to Dinwiddie Court-house, where its advance encountered a portion of our cavalry and retired. In the afternoon parts of Hill's and Gordon's troops demonstrated against the enemy on the left of Hatcher's Run, near Armstrong's mill. Finding him entrenched, they were withdrawn after dark. During the night the force that had advanced beyond the creek returned to it, and were reported to be recrossing. This morning Pegram's division moved down the right bank of the creek to reconnoiter, when it was vigorously attacked. The battle was obstinately contested several hours, but Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An official paper which was never sent. (search)
An official paper which was never sent. The following letter explains itself. We should be glad to learn something more concerning the lieutenants who wrote the document quoted: Council bluffs, Iowa, February 11, 1881. Dr. J. W. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir,--In the winter of 1864 and the spring of 1865 I served in the Army of the Potomac, in front of Petersburg, and was present during the last gallant efforts of the Army of Northern Virginia. Upon reaching the inside of the Confederate works in the vicinity of the point where the Weldon railroad crossed the trenches I saw a bunch of papers, the one corner of which lay in a pool of blood. Near by was also the shattered carriage of a gun, indicating that one of our shells had dismounted it. Everywhere were the signs of a desperate struggle, though the dead and wounded had been removed. I picked up the package of papers, supposing that some poor fellow had dropped them as he fell, and they might lea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. by J. Wm. Jones. [Prefatory Note.--The readers of our Papers will bear witness that the Secretary has not often troubled them with his own writing, preferring that our valuable space should be filled by other pens. As I have been, however, frequently urged by gentlemen, in whose judgment I have great confidence, to publish a series of papers whithe camp, the bivouac, the hospital, and on the battlefield.] Paper no. 1. Early days of the war. It was my proud privilege to follow the fortunes of the Army of Northern Virginia, from Harper's Ferry, in 1861, to Appomattox Court-house, in 1865. Entering the service as high private in the rear rank, and afterward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and knowing what occurred. Personally acquainted with Robert E
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
om fulfilling our purpose of accepting a kind invitation to be present on the happy occasion. It would have been indeed a sweet privilege to mingle with old comrades of the First Maryland regiment, and of other commands, and to have heard the speeches of General Wade Hampton, General W. H. F. Lee, General B. T. Johnson, General D. H. Maury, and others. We rejoice in all of these gatherings of old Confederates, in all of these efforts to keep alive the memories of the brave old days of 1861-65. But we cannot emphasize too earnestly our conviction of the importance of utilizing these occasions in order to put into permanent form, for the use of the future historian, the history of the commands which these gallant gentlemen represent. The day is not distant when the seats of these heroic soldiers at the festive board will be vacant, and the true story of their glorious deeds lost to the world, unless those who made the history shall tell it as it was, and in such form as that it c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battery Gregg-reply to General N. H. Harris. (search)
hundred; it is possible I may have underestimated, though they were placed there by my order and in my presence. That number of men was, I thought at the time, as many as could conveniently fire over the crest of the work. General Harris referred by name to those who had written of the attack and defence of Gregg, as well as to the time of, and periodicals in which publications were made, and adds, I shall now state a few facts from memoranda made in writing in the latter part of the year 1865 ; and then gives information as to where his brigade was the night of April 1st, and how and under what orders he reported to me the next morning near the Newman house, on the plank road. Then says, As I approached I saw that the enemy had broken his (Wilcox) lines in heavy force, and was extending in line of battle across the open fields in direction of the Southside railroad. This quotation may make the impression, whether so designed or not, that the heavy body of the enemy seen by him o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.50 (search)
d. The shaft rests on a handsome base and is very graceful in its proportions, and on reverse sides are the following simple and appropriate inscriptions: Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiania division, and from Manassas to Appomattox, 1861 to 1865. The statue itself is eight feet nine inches high, and the remark of an old soldier present, as the veil was drawn aside, but echoed the universal verdict of those familiar with the form and features of the great chieftain: That is old Stonewalname of living man shall be placed on it. The simple inscription, Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiana division, tells its own story. If you wish more look on the other side of the die — there is the whole story: From Manassas to Appomattox, 1861-1865. Remarks of President John B. Richardson.Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Tomb Committee: On behalf of the members of the Louisiana Division, Army of Northern Virginia, it becomes my pleasing duty to accept from your hands this handsome tom
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
st of George N. Sanders; twenty-five thousand dollars for the arrest of Beverley Tucker; ten thousand dollars for the arrest of W. W. Cleary, late clerk of C. C. Clay. The Provost-Marshall-General of the United States is directed to cause a description of said persons, with notice of the above rewards, to be published. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, the 2d day of May, in the year of our Lord 1865, and of the independence of the United States of America, the eighty-ninth. Andrew Johnson. By the President: W. Hunter, Acting Secretary State. The evidence in the Bureau of Military Justice, upon which this accusation was brought against persons, some of whom had occupied high positions under the Federal Government, and all of whom through. life had enjoyed the confidence of their fellow-citizens, and unblemished reputations as private gentlemen, was carefully withheld fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Experiences of a Northern man in the Confederate army. (search)
es. To understand this apparent contradiction it is only necessary to remember, that people are generally influenced in their opinions by what they believe at the time to be their interests, and that they now hold that their material interests are centered in the Union, whereas formerly they attached great importance to local government. Ergo, States-Rights doctrines are now at a discount, but that does not prove that they were not correct, or that one was wrong in entertaining them in 1861-1865, If, however, it be a true saying that nothing is more successful than success, it is equally true that nothing is more unsuccessful than failure. The French have a proverb in which there is much pithy truth, which says les abseus ont tonjours tart; from the result of the war we might learn to paraphrase this by saying the unsuccessful are always in the wrong. The war had been raging for about two years, a time of suffering and of carnage for the participants on both sides, but also a per
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade (search)
History of Lane's North Carolina brigade by General James H. Lane. Campaign 1865. March to Jarratt's Station and back. During the winter of 1864-5, about the time General Early returned from his Valley campaign, the Federal cavalry made a raid on the Petersburg and Weldon railroad, and our brigade formed a part of the force sent to Jarratt's Station. On our march to that point we suffered intensely from the hail and the snow, and a high and bitter cold wind. When we reached the stati5, about the time General Early returned from his Valley campaign, the Federal cavalry made a raid on the Petersburg and Weldon railroad, and our brigade formed a part of the force sent to Jarratt's Station. On our march to that point we suffered intensely from the hail and the snow, and a high and bitter cold wind. When we reached the station the enemy had retired, and we had to return to our winter quarters over the hard frozen ground. On our return one of our brigade, seeing a barefooted Floridian slowly picking his way over the frozen ground, left ranks, and approaching him, said: Look here, mister, I don't know who you are, but I can't stand that. Taking off his knapsack, he took out a pair of new shoes, put them on, and handed his old ones, a very good pair, to the poor fellow, with the remark: Here, take these, and I wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The infantry of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
igher and more stubborn spirit attached to liberty than those to the northward. * * * In other countries the people more simple, of a less mercurial cast, judge of an ill principle in government only by an actual grievance; here they anticipate the evil and judge of the pressure of the grievance, by the badness of the principle. They augur misgovernment at a distance, and snuff the approach of tyranny in every tainted breeze. These words of Mr. Burke are as applicable to the soldiers of 1861-5 as to their patriot sires of 1776. Their strong love of liberty and keen appreciation of its blessings, their sturdy self-reliance and habits of rule, exaggerated doubtless by the peculiar conditions of Southern society, gave them a conscious self-respect, a spirit of personal independence, a sense of their own importance, an individuality and pride that made each man feel as if the fate of every battle hung on his single arm. Thoroughly satisfied of the justice of their cause, animated by
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