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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 5 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
irginia in 1864, and in North Carolina with Joe Johnston in 1865. Colonel Colquitt was promoted to brigadier-general and sucned to Virginia in time for the defense of Petersburg. In 1865 it participated in the campaign of the Carolinas, surrender brilliant career with the army under Lee. In the spring of 1865 it was in North Carolina under General Johnston, and surrenr Hampton in the campaign of the Carolinas in the spring of 1865, surrendering with Johnston, April 26th. The gallant Colonf Wade Hampton they served in Virginia through 1864, and in 1865 followed that gallant leader through the campaign of the Cahe greater part of 1864 in the defense of that city, and in 1865 was in the campaign of the Carolinas under General Johnstonturned to Virginia, serving in the Petersburg lines, and in 1865 was engaged in the campaign of the Carolinas until includedssee, and in the campaign of the Carolinas in the spring of 1865, surrendering with General Johnston. During its term of se
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
Tennessee campaigns of 1864. In the spring of 1865 the Thirty-seventh regiment and Fourth battalioanta and Tennessee campaigns. In the spring of 1865 it was consolidated with parts of the Thirty-foanta and Tennessee campaigns. In the spring of 1865 it was consolidated with the Forty-first and Foelf well on all occasions, and in the spring of 1865 was consolidated with the Fortieth and Forty-fiSavannah in Hardee's command. In the spring of 1865 it was consolidated with the Forty-sixth Georgianta and Tennessee campaigns. In the spring of 1865 the Second and Eighth Georgia battalions were c Lieut.-Col. James C. Gordon. In the spring of 1865 these two regiments were consolidated with the , 1864, and in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865. Girardey's battery, under Capt. 1. P. Girard subsequently in Georgia, and in the spring of 1865 took an active part in the campaign of the Carothe campaign of the Carolinas, in the spring of 1865, and surrendered with the rest of the army near[18 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Chapter 18: Final campaign in Virginia Georgia commands at Appomattox campaign of the Carolinas Wilson's raid. The Georgia brigades in the army of Northern Virginia bore an honorable part in the military operations of 1865. Though reduced in numbers, they maintained their relative strength in an army where all suffered. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, promoted to major-general, and later acting lieutenant-general, honored the State as commander of the Second army corps. Longs849, DuBose's 1,012, Simms' 824, Evans' 1,328, Cook's 702, Sorrel's 1,329, Thomas' 1,159; total infantry 8,445. The grand total present for the army at that time was 51,014 infantry. Hence it appears that one man in six in General Lee's army in 1865 was a Georgian. At Appomattox, the following numbers of officers and men were paroled in the Georgia brigades: In Anderson's 987, Benning's 809, DuBose's 347, Simms' 190, Cook's 350, Evans' 841, Sorrel's 1,033, Thomas' 513, a total of 5,070 out
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
was a planter in that State until 1849, when he moved back to Georgia. He resided in Jefferson county, Ga., from 1849 to 1853, and from 1853 to 1861 in Richmond county. From 1853 to 1861 he was a captain of Georgia militia. When the war of 1861-65 began, he entered the service of the Confederate States as captain in the Sixteenth regiment Georgia infantry, of which he was commissioned colonel in February, 1862. The regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Howell Cobb, of Magruder's diviied, leaving to his State the precious legacy of a noble record of valor and devotion to duty. Brigadier-General William T. Wofford Brigadier-General William T. Wofford had learned something of the art of war before the great conflict of 1861-65, having served as a captain in the Mexican war. Returning home, he soon became a prominent lawyer and member of the legislature. He was a delegate to the Southern convention of 1858, and a member of the secession convention of 1861. He was oppose