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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
d dawn has begun. [After concluding his paper Dr. Burrows stated that a clipping from a newspaper had been sent to him after he had prepared his paper, giving an incident of considerable interest, which he desired to read to the meeting, and on being informed by the President that the meeting would be pleased to hear it, he read the following extract from a letter written by M. Quad in the Detroit Free Press of a recent date]: One of the occupants of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under circumstances which seemed to prove him a spy, and while waiting for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expression and great powers of mimicry. One evening, while singing a song for the amusement of his fellow-prisoners, he suddenly stopped, threw up his hands, staggered, and fell like a bag of sand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
d dawn has begun. [After concluding his paper Dr. Burrows stated that a clipping from a newspaper had been sent to him after he had prepared his paper, giving an incident of considerable interest, which he desired to read to the meeting, and on being informed by the President that the meeting would be pleased to hear it, he read the following extract from a letter written by M. Quad in the Detroit Free Press of a recent date]: One of the occupants of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under circumstances which seemed to prove him a spy, and while waiting for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expression and great powers of mimicry. One evening, while singing a song for the amusement of his fellow-prisoners, he suddenly stopped, threw up his hands, staggered, and fell like a bag of sand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
generally, in which he justifies the hanging of Wirtz, but attributes the responsibility of murdering thousands of Union soldiers to the hellish malice of the representative men of the Southern Confederacy, two of the most prominent of whom were Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee, displays on his own part a blind malice, only equalled by his profound ignorance of the facts, We shall hereafter pay our respects to some of these remarkable utterances— remarkable for one writing in 1882 instead of 1865—and show up their utter absurdity. Meantime, if Mr. Gerrish can produce a single one of the orders from General Lee or President Davis, or any other prominent Confederate leader which, either directly or indirectly, approved of cruelty to prisoners, he will make a contribution to history, which Holt and his infamous band of Perjurers, in the days when the Bureau of Military Justice was flourishing, sought for in vain. But despite of these very serious blots, it is a well written book, whi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. The Virginia campaign of 1864 and 1865; the Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James. By A. A. Humph-Reys. Price, $100. Statistical records of the armies of the United States. By Frederick Phisterer. Price, $100. New York: Charles. Scribner's Sons. We have received these books from the publishers through West & Johnston, of Richmond, and we are also indebted to General Humphreys for copies of his book. Reserving for the future a full review of both, we can only say now that we are reading General Humphreys's with great interest and pleasure, and while we shall have occasion to controvert some of his statements, we regard it as the work of an able soldier, very carefully prepared after a full study of all accessible material, and written in fine style and admirable spirit. The contrast between the fairness with which General Humphreys treats the men who fought against him, and the miserable partisan spirit shown by such writers as Doubleday and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
home, and turning his back on such offers as would have broken down the resistant patriotism of many a less ardent nature, he came back to Virginia at the close of 1865. When he landed in New York he was offered such advantages as were most tempting to an ambitious young artist; but he rather chose to cast in his lot with his ownitten in 1798, making bequest of $50,000 to Liberty Hall Academy. Action of the Board of Trustees calling General Lee to the presidency of Washington College in 1865. General Lee's letter of acceptance. Personal Recollections of General Lee, by General Pendleton, delivered by him on the second anniversary of his death. nd old battery, whose prowess had illustrated well nigh every battle-field of the Army of Northern Virginia from Falling Waters in 1861 to Appomattox Courthouse in 1865. Among those present on this occasion were noted: Colonel McLaughlin, Colonel W. T. Poague, Sergeants S. C. Smith, D. E. Moore, J. E. McCauley, Corporals Willi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
austed. the Reunion of Morgan's men at Lexington, Ky., on the 24th, 25th, and 26th of July, was a joyous and interesting occasion, which we regret that our limited space now will not enable us to describe in full. About 1200 of the old command and, perhaps, 500 comrades and invited guests of other Confederate commands were present, and it was indeed pleasant to mingle with these veterans as under the shade of the beautiful grove of Woodland Park they recalled the stirring events of 1861-1865, as they rode with their gallant chief on so many daring raids—fought under him on so many glorious fields—suffered with him in the prison,—rejoiced at his daring escape—or wept over his sad death. The first day Colonel Frank Waters made an address of welcome on behalf of the City of Lexington, and General William Preston, one for both the city and county. General Basil W. Duke, President of the Association, responded in behalf of Morgan's men. There were also speeches by Governor McC
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. A Review of General Humphreys by Colonel William Allan. The last of the Campaigns of the Civil War, issued by the Scribners, forms in every way a fitting and creditable conclusion of the series. This volume has been looked for with unusual interest, because of its author and of the period itten too much, perhaps, in the style of an official report, to be entertaining to the casual reader; but its interest to the student of the great campaign of 1864-1865 can hardly be exaggerated. This campaign was incomparably the greatest of the civil war. In the desperate daily struggle, unintermitted for months, in the unparerations in this campaign; and failure, under whatever circumstances, invites criticism. The difficulties which confronted General Lee in the winter and spring of 1865 were simply insurmountable. Human skill and courage were not adequate to the task of turning back the tidal wave which was rapidly engulphing the Confederacy. Af
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
rical Society is indebted to the enlightened liberality of W. W. Corcoran, Esqr., for their possession of these papers and their ability to use them, and they have very properly accompanied the volume with a fine likeness of the great philanthropist, and his autograph letter making the valuable gift. The few extra copies for sale will, of course, be bought up at once, as no historic collection could be called complete without the Dinwiddie Papers. recollections of A naval officer. 1841-1865. By Captain William Hamar Parker. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. We have received, with the compliments of the author, through West, Johnston & Co., Richmond, this beautifully gotten up book, and have time and space now only to say that a slight dipping into its pages shows conclusively that our gallant Confederate tar knows how to wield a pen as well as how to sail or fight a ship, and has produced a book of rare interest and decided historic value. We mean to give it a careful read
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
ll ended pre-eminent services to the cause he had espoused with singleness of heart and maintained with unexcelled constancy of purpose and courage. He needs no eulogy from any. Those attached to his person, or often in contact, have simply to say, We loved him. It is for his surviving comrades of the Third corps, and especially those of the old A. P. Hill's Light Division, that the details of their General's last ride of duty are more particularly given. During the entire winter of 1864-1865 General Hill was an invalid and was absent in Richmond on a sick-leave from about March 20th, returning to his command upon being advised of the operations on the right beyond Hatcher's Run. April 1, accompanied by his staff and couriers, he spent in the saddle from early morning until about 9 P. M., returning at night along the works held by his corps as far as those in front of Fort Gregg, where the General halted a considerable time. He passed only a few words with his staff party or thos