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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ng a brigade for about fifteen months, in 1863-64, after brilliant service in the battle of Olustree, Fla., where the Federals suffered defeat. In the defense of Charleston he was an important factor, and during the Federal assault upon Fort Wagner, on July 22, 1863, he arrived with his regiment just in time to reinforce the garrison and crush the Federals. When Fort Wagner later had to be given up, he went to Christ Church Parish with his command and assisted the garrison at Sumter until 1865. After reaching the rank of Brigadier General, he continued to command a brigade of A. P. Stewart's corps during the campaigns in the Carolinas. At this time he was only 23 years of age, and was the youngest Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army. He was wounded three times, twice at John's Island and once at Olustree, where his horse was shot from under him. For some time he was in command at Florence, S. C., where he built a stockade for Federal prisoners and had charge of about
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mississippi troops who served in Virginia, 1861-1865. (search)
Mississippi troops who served in Virginia, 1861-1865. 2nd Mississippi Regiment, 11th Mississippi Regiment, 26th Mississippi Regiment, 42nd Mississippi Regiment, comprising the Brigade commanded by General Reuben Davis, who survived the war-now dead. (A relative of President Davis.) 12th Mississippi Regiment, 16th Mississippi Regiment, 19th Mississippi Regiment, 48th Mississippi Regiment, comprising the Brigade commanded by General W. S. Featherstone, who was transferred to Mississippi, now dead. General Carnot Posey, killed at Bristow Station. General N. H. Harris, who survived the war, now dead. This Brigade suffered severely at the Bloody Angle, battle of Spotsylvania, but was able to recover it from the enemy. 13th Mississippi Regiment, 17th Mississippi Regiment, 18th Mississippi Regiment, 21st Mississippi Regiment, comprising the Brigade commanded by General Richard Griffith, killed at Savage Station. General William Barksdale, killed at Gettysburg. Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
Seed cover of the Confederacy. From the Jackson clarion-ledger, December, 1907. The famous boy Company of Richmond, commanded by Captain W. W. Parker—the Confederate Women— their encouragement and efforts were behind the movements of the men in the field. In the Great War Between the States, from 1861 to 1865, the Confederate States, because of the great odds in numbers and resources of every kind, including recruits from Europe entering the armies of the Union, had to have in the Confederate armies every musket available in its defense. It was a common remark during the war that the South was robbing the cradle if not the grave, and this was nearer true than is commonly believed, when we consider what is generally recognized as the arms-bearing population of the country, from eighteen to forty or forty-five years of age, even when in extremity the greatest drafts are made to fill the ranks of armies in wars. The Confederate armies had in its ranks many boys from fourteen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
spoils and put them to ignominious route, capturing all their wagons, eighteen pieces of artillery, their ambulances and 800 negroes, who had been abducted from their homes. In the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864, Sheridan's first success over Early in the Valley, Fitz Lee did all that was possible to stem the adverse tide. Three horses were shot under him—one his favorite, Nellie Gray—and then he himself was brought to the ground by a minie ball in the thigh. In the spring of 1865 he was placed in command of the cavalry corps of the army, and followed its fortunes till the end came at Appomattox, fighting daily and desperately. The selfsacri-ficing, heroic and faithful body of men—infantry, cavalry, artillery and engineers—who composed the remnant of that glorious army, and fought constantly and courageously to the last, furnish to the world an example of devotion to right, duty and country, which has few, if any, parallels in history. General Fitz was always fre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
ct of secession (but merely to discuss that subject from the standpoint of abstract right), in order to vindicate the character of the South for loyalty, and to wipe off the charges of treason and rebellion from the names and memories of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Albert Sydney Johnston, Robert E. Lee and all who fought and suffered in the great war of coercion. The recent Confederate Reunion at Richmond; Va., where gathered once again the survivors of the historic struggle of 1861-5, makes timely the republication of the work under review; and, as a valuable contribution to the history of this subject, this work should be included in all public libraries and generally read. It is true that it cannot be claimed for this work that it is a dispassionate summary of the arguments which have been advanced on both sides of the great question which it discusses. It was written too close to the culmination of the deadly strife in arms for this to be expected. It does not cont
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
er he went to St. Louis. He was the founder of the Lodge of Odd Fellows in Winchester, which is called Hickman Lodge, in his honer. When the war began he was in St. Louis, and enlisted in a body of Confederate troops that was raised there, but he was captured by General Seigle, and imprisoned. He escaped from prison and made his way to his home in Winchester, where he was again arrested, and paced in prison in Lexington, but escaped from that prison also. When the 11th Kentucky Cavalry was recruited he joined it, and was made adjutant, with the rank of captain, and served gallantly until his capture on the Ohio raid, after which he was imprisoned in the Ohio penitentiary, Johnson's Island, Allegheny penitentiary, Pa., and Point Lookout, Md., remaining a prisoner until the close of the war, when he was released, reaching there on May I, 1865. About 1875 he left Winchester for the West, and has never been heard of since. No man ever had more friends, or more devoted ones, than he.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
reatly distorted: Villa Jessie, Cannes, France, April 17, 1901. General Marcus J. Wright: My Dear General,—I enclose the narrative of my journey to France in 1865, intended to refute the suggestions of the Washington Post, and beg that you will kindly, in defence of the honor of President Jefferson Davis, General Kirby Smithtory. In two editorials of the Washington Post, March 14 and 19, 1901, the suggestion is made and repeated that toward the close of the war of secession, in 1865, I was sent to Europe by President Jefferson Davis on an important mission, the object of which was to offer to the Emperor of the French a retrocession of the Sta some good by conveying information abroad. Letters which I received about that time, having strengthened this opinion, I repaired to Shreveport in .the winter of 1865, and suggested to General Kirby Smith the advisability of granting me a six months leave of absence for the purpose of going abroad and of availing myself of the c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
lliam Boyd, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. Captain James D. Waid, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. First Lieutenant, George P. Haw, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865; lost an arm. Second Lieutenant, John W. David1865; lost an arm. Second Lieutenant, John W. Davidson, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. Third Lieutenant, William N. Parsley, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. Allan, James B. Allan, Robert (dead). Atkins, H. C. Atkins, William T. (dead). Batkins, Cornelius (dead). Bowles1865. Third Lieutenant, William N. Parsley, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. Allan, James B. Allan, Robert (dead). Atkins, H. C. Atkins, William T. (dead). Batkins, Cornelius (dead). Bowles, William. Boyd, George G. (dead). Boyd, William (dead). Brown, Lucian. Brown, P. H. (lost arm and leg; dead). Burch, E. T. Burton, Marcus. Butler, John M. (dead). Carlton, Charles. Cook, Lawrence (dead). Corbin, John G.1865. Allan, James B. Allan, Robert (dead). Atkins, H. C. Atkins, William T. (dead). Batkins, Cornelius (dead). Bowles, William. Boyd, George G. (dead). Boyd, William (dead). Brown, Lucian. Brown, P. H. (lost arm and leg; dead). Burch, E. T. Burton, Marcus. Butler, John M. (dead). Carlton, Charles. Cook, Lawrence (dead). Corbin, John G. Cosby, John O. (wounded and dead). Christian, Horace (dead). Christian, R. A. (detailed; dead). Crump, Edward. Curtis, Armistead (dead). Dunn, John H. (killed at Drewry's Bluff). Dunn, Charles (killed at Drewry's Bluff). Dunn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
r, 118 Ewing D. D., Rev. Daniel B., 85 F Company, Richmond, Va., 59, 372 Farragut, How mosquitos prevented the captured of, 174 Federal Atrocities. 1861-5., 304 Five Forks, The 11th Va. at, 357 Folkes, Thomas M., 59 Forrest's Secret of Success Gen., 81, 83, 263 Frazier's Farm, Battle of, 366 Funkhouser, H. Dy, Commodore, M. F., 371 Maury Col. R. L., 371 Memminger, Secretary C. G., 201 Memorial Day, The first Confederate 369 Mississippi Troops in Virginia, 1861-5 58 Morgan's Raid through Ohio and Indiana, 110; in Kentucky 263; Horses Impressed, 118 Moore J. Staunton, 121 Morris Island Prisoners Fired on, 275 Negroes the Southern Cause, 127 Payne, Gen., Wm. H., 134 Petersburg. Defence of, in June, 1864, 1 Tablet to the Killed, 12 Polignac C. J.; His Mission to France in 1865 326 Prison Pens at Point Lookout 19 Quisenberry, Adam Chenault, 259 Ramsay, C. S. Navy, Lieut. J. F.. 242 Ridley, Capt. killed, 43 Rives, Timothy, cap