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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,747 1,747 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 574 574 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 435 435 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 98 98 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 58 58 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 54 54 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 53 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1865 AD or search for 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. By J. W. Mallet, ex-Lieut. Col. of Artillery and Superintendent of Confederate States Ordnance Laboratories. President Jefferson Davis bluntly stated the truth when he wrote that it soon became evident to all that the South had gone to war without counting the cost. Our chief difficulty was the want of arms and munitions of war. In the interval between the election and the inauguration of President Lincohe United States Army, is conspicuously reproducing his father's organizing power as the Chief Sanitary Officer of the Panama Canal Works. There remains to mention but one other phase of the work of ordnance officers in the troublous times of 1861-65—namely, the organizing and drilling of forces for local defense against the enemy, made up of the white workmen and other employees at several of the arsenals. There was quite a respectable force of this kind at Richmond; Augusta had a good strong
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
1862. Cocke, Edmund R., fourth captain; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Weymouth, John E,, first lieutenant; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863; dead. Austin, Cornelius, second lieutenant; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Cocke, William F., third lieutenant; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Dobbs, Henry J., color sergeant; promoted lieutenant; wounded at Frazer's Farm, Va., 1st July, 1862. Non-commissioned officers and privates. Bagby, Bates, killed near Petersburg, Va., 1865. Barker, Charles, exempted from service, 1861; dead. Barker, Jesse, color sergeant; killed at Sharpsburg, Md., 1862. Barker, Joce, exempted from service, 1862. Barker,, John, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Bootwright, James, killed on picket post near Richmond, Va., 1862. Boston, Solon A., color sergeant, killed at Williamsburg, Va., May 1st, 1862. Bragg, William, exempted from service, 1862. Bryant, Richard A., died in service, 1862. Carroll, John D., lost his li
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
n a solid granite pedestal two and one-half feet high. On the shaft is a pedestrian statue of a private soldier seven feet high, with musket at arms rest position. The cost of that shaft was $10,000. It bears the following inscripion: 1861-1865. Fifteenth regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. Erected by the State of New Jersey to mark that portion of the Confederate line held by the Fourteenth Georgia Regiment and assaulted May 12, 1864, by the Fifteenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteer Infivate John S. Gibson and Private Henry W. Hoffman. At Salem Church. The monument at Salem Church is built of New Hampshire granite, and is said to have cost $20,000. The shaft bears the following inscription: Sixth Army Corps, 1861-1865. To commemorate the services of the Fifteenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel William H. Penrose, U. S. A. Engaged two hours on this line of battle on the Federal side, May 3, 1863. Loss, 41 killed, 105 wounded, 4 mi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who was last soldier to leave burning city. (search)
e of record between Lieutenant-Colonel H. Kyd Douglas, of Hagerstown, Md., and myself. When not quite twenty-three we both left our homes in Maryland and enlisted as private soldiers in the Confederate Army in the spring of 1861. That fall we were both promoted to the staff as first lieutenants and aides-de-camp. In 1864 we were both in the Adjutant-General's Department with the rank of captain on the brigade staff. When our respective generals became major-generals in the early spring of 1865, we became entitled to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, but application was not made for our commissions as such, because we were both recommended to be made brigadier-generals. The order for such commissions was issued by President Davis, but did not reach us in the general turmoil and confusion of the last days of Richmond. When General Ewell was ordered by General Lee, on April 2, to evacuate the north branch of the James and march on to Amelia Courthouse, he selected me to command his ex
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wisdom's famous raid. (search)
Wisdom's famous raid. Heroic Journey recalled by his death in Alabama. Gadsden, Ala., July 29. John H. Wisdom, who died near here to-day at the age of eighty-seven years, won fame in 1865 by a daring all night ride from Gadsden to Rome, Ga., a distance of sixty-seven miles, which resulted in the capture by the Confederate cavalry leader, General N. B. Forrest, of General Abel D. Straight, and the saving of the Confederates of the foundries and stores at Rome. Wisdom started from the east shore of the Coosa River shortly after night-fall on his perilous trip, covering the distance in less than seven hours, and using on the trip seven horses. He arrived at Rome six hours ahead of General Straight, and the city was prepared for the latter's coming, General Straight and many of his raiders taken prisoners.