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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
from Battery Buchanan. I did not know of their approach until the general came to me on the works and remarked, Lamb, my boy, I have come to share your fate. You and your garrison are to be sacrificed. I replied, Don't say so, General; we shall certainly whip the enemy again. He then told me that when he left Wilmington General Bragg was hastily removing his stores and ammunition, and was looking for a place to fall back upon. In a report to General Lee, dictated at Fort Fisher January 18th, 1865, and in another inclosing the first one) dated Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, February 19th, 1865, General Whiting blames General Bragg for the loss of Fort Fisher, and asks that the latter's conduct be investigated. He says: I went into the fort with the conviction that it was to be sacrificed, for the last I heard General Bragg say, was to point out a line to fall back on if Fort Fisher fell. General Bragg was charged with the command and defense of Wilmington, by the Secretary of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
as much bound to mourn their loss as those who have held higher positions. They are all regretted deeply here, and their names will be forever associated with one of the most gallant attacks ever made on a powerful fortress. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of fleet-captain K. R. Breese. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Malvern, off Fort Fisher, January 18, 1865. Admiral — In my report of the assault on Fort Fisher I have scarcely mentioned the names and services of Lieutenant S. W. Preston, your flag-lieutenant, and Lieutenant B. H. Porter, your flag-captain, thinking that by a little delay I might the more do justice, yet I seem to feel that impossible in me; Preston, after accomplishing most splendidly the work assigned him by you, which was both dangerous and laborious, under constant fire, came to me, as my aide, for orders, showing no
of dividing the enemy's forces and. distracting his attention from his real objective, so as to prevent a concentration to resist him in the difficult, inhospitable region through which his course lay. Incessant rains, which flooded most of the adjacent country, giving the Savannah at Sister's ferry a surface width of nearly three miles, submerging the causeway road, and breaking up Gen. Slocum's pontoon-bridge, compelled a delay of a fortnight; during which, Savannah was made over Jan. 18, 1865. to Gen. Foster: Gen. Grover's division of the 19th corps having been sent by Gen. Grant to form its garrison. Some feints were made from Pocotaligo of an advance on Charleston; Foster's position between the Coosawhatchie and Tullifinny abandoned as no longer of use; and at length — the flood having somewhat abated — Sherman's whole army moved Feb. 1. nearly northward; Slocum, with Kilpatrick, crossing the Savannah at Sister's ferry or Purysburg, and moving on Barnwell and Beaufort's
ss. Mr. Davis said the vote of thanks would have more moral value to the hero it was intended to honor if it were done deliberately and according to the practice of the Senate. The motion to refer was lost, and the joint resolution was unanimously passed, and approved by the President on the tenth of January, 1865. No. Lxxvi.--The Resolution to present the Thanks of Congress to Major-General Alfred H. Terry, and the Officers and Men under his Command. In the Senate, on the eighteenth of January, 1865, Mr. Dixon, of Connecticut, introduced a joint resolution tendering the thanks of Congress to Major-General Alfred H. Terry for the brilliant victory of Fort Fisher, and it was read twice and referred to the Military Committee. On the nineteenth, Mr. Wilson, from the Military Committee, reported it back in a new draft. The amendment of the Committee was to strike out after the resolving clause, and insert: That the thanks of Congress be presented to Major-General Alfred H. Terry,
am ready to send a commission whenever I have reason to suppose it will be received, or to receive a commission if the United States Government shall choose to send one. That, notwithstanding the rejection of our former offers, I would, if you could promise that a commissioner, minister, or other agent would be received, appoint one immediately, and renew the effort to enter into conference with a view to secure peace to the two countries. Yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. Washington, January 18, 1865. F. P. Blair, Esq. Sir: You having shown me Mr. Davis's letter to you of the 12th instant, you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now, and shall continue ready to receive any agent whom he or any other influential person now resisting the national authority may informally send to me with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Yours, etc., A. Lincoln. When Blair returned and gave me this letter of Lincoln of January 18th, it being a res
such orders as may be necessary for defence of rivers at those points; obstructions and torpedoes recommended for Tennessee River must be used there. G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Military division of the West, Tupelo, Miss., Jan. 18th, 1865. Genl. J. B. Hood, Comdg. Army of Tenn.: General,—General Beauregard directs that you will hold Lee's corps in readiness to move as soon as necessary preparations can be made for its transportation, and that you will cause it to be thoroor Montgomery, Ala. The field transportation of the above-named troops shall accompany them. Respectfiully, your obedient servant, Henry Bryan, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Military division of the West, Tupelo, Miss., Jan. 18th, 1865. Genl. J. B. Hood, Comdg. Army of Tenn.: General,—Understanding that the transportation of Lee's corps will be ready in the morning, I desire the movement of Lee's corps from here to Augusta, via Montgomery, Macon, and Milledgeville, sho
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Arkansas, 1865 (search)
nt). UNITED STATES--60th Colored Infantry (Co. "C"). Jan. 12: Affair near Sugar Loaf PrairieMISSOURI--45th Enrolled Militia. Jan. 14: Skirmish, DardanelleIOWA--1st Cavalry (Detachment). KANSAS--2d Battery Light Arty. (Detachment). Union loss, 1 killed, 15 wounded, 2 missing. Total, 18. Jan. 17: Skirmish, Ivey's FordU. S. TRANSPORTS and Detachments from various Regiments. Jan. 15: Skirmish, Madison County(No Reports.) Jan. 15-18: Exp. from Pine BluffILLINOIS--13th Cavalry (Detachment). Jan. 18: Skirmish, Clarksville(No Reports.) Jan. 20-21: Skirmishes, MarionILLINOIS--11th Cavalry. INDIANA--7th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--2d Cavalry (Detachments). Union loss, 1 wounded. Jan. 22: Affair, Benton Road near Little RockAttack on pickets. Union loss, 3 wounded, 3 missing. Total, 6. Jan. 22-Feb. 4: Exp. from Little Rock to Mt. Elba, and skirmish at Saline RiverARKANSAS--1st Colored Battery Light Arty. ILLINOIS--13th Cavalry; 43d, 106th and 126th Infantry. INDIANA--50th Infantry. IOWA--1st Ca
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1865 (search)
; 6th and 7th Infantry. INDIANA--14th Infantry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--3d, 4th and 7th Infantry. NEW YORK 16th Heavy Arty., 16th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 15th Engineers (Cos. "A," "I"); 3d, 47th, 48th, 112th, 115th, 117th, 142d and 169th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--76th, 97th and 203 Infantry. UNITED STATES--Battery "E" 3d Arty.; 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 27th, 30th, 37th and 39th Colored Infantry. Jan. 9: Skirmish, Disputanta StationPENNSYLVANIA--16th Cavalry. Union loss, 2 killed, 3 wounded. Total, 5. Jan. 18: Affair near LovettsvilleNEW YORK--6th Cavalry. Jan. 23-24: Actions, Fort BradyCONNECTICUT--1st Heavy Arty. Union loss, 4 killed, 10 wounded. Total, 14. Jan. 25: Skirmish near PowhatanUNITED STATES--1st Colored Cavalry. Union loss, 3 killed, 16 wounded. Total, 19. Jan. 30: Scout to Long and Bottom's BridgeNEW YORK--7th Cavalry (1st M. R.). MARYLAND--1st Cavalry. Feb. 4-6: Expedition from Winchester to Moorfield, W. Va.CONNECTICUT--1st Cavalry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--1st Cavalry. NEW YORK--8th a
E. S. Bragg Brigadier GeneralAug. 24, 1864, to Sept. 13, 1864. 3d Brigade, 3d Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJan. 18, 1865, to Feb. 14, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJune 7, 1864, to Aug. 24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralSept. 13, 1864, to Dec. 22, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 6th Wis. InfantryMay 6, 1864, to June 6, 1864. 3d Brigade, 4th Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Poto
C. Crowninshield Col. 2d Mass. CavalryJan. 26, 1865, to Jan. 31, 1865. 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, Department of the Shenandoah Lt.-Col. 2d Mass. CavalryJan. 18, 1865, to Jan. 26 1865. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, Department of the Shenandoah Lt.-Col. 2d Mass. CavalryJan. 31, 1865, to Feb. 10, 1865. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, Department of the Shenandoah Lt.-Col. 2d Mass. CavalryJan. 6, 1865, to Jan. 15, 1865. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, Department of the Shenandoah Lt.-Col. 2d Mass. CavalryOct. 19, 1864, to Dec. 13, 1864. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, Department of the Shenand
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