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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for January 24th, 1865 AD or search for January 24th, 1865 AD in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
th and 18th, she, with other vessels, engaged the Virginia and the Richmond and Confederate troops under General R. E. Lee, to cover the advance of Federals under General Butler. The Canonicus participated in the Fort Fisher expedition, and to her belongs the honor of capturing the British blockade-runner Deer off Charleston, February 18, 1865. In the center appears the gunboat Massasoit. In the last action that took place with the Confederate flotilla on the James, at Trent's Reach, January 24, 1865, it was the Massasoit that received the only damage from the guns of the hostile vessels and the battery at Howlett's house. In the two-hour action after the return of the Onondaga up-stream, five men on the Massasoit were wounded. She was one of the third-class double-ender armored vessels and mounted ten guns. During this action she was commanded by Lieutenant G. W. Sumner, who displayed the utmost coolness and bravery in handling his vessel. The monitor Canonicus The mo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
diplomats at Paris, he was compelled to revoke the guarantee that had been given to Slidell and Bulloch. A plan was arranged, however, by which M. Arman should sell the vessels to various European powers; and he disposed of the ironclad ram Sphinx to the Danish Government, then at war with Prussia. Delivery of the ship at Copenhagen was not made, however, till after the war had ceased, and no trouble was experienced by the Confederates in arranging for the purchase of the vessel. On January 24, 1865, she rendezvoused off Quiberon, on the French coast; the remainder of her officers, crew, and supplies were put aboard of her; the Confederate flag was hoisted over her, and she was christened the Stonewall. Already the vessel was discovered to have sprung a leak, and Captain Page ran into Ferrol, Spain. Here dock — yard facilities were at first granted, but were withdrawn at the protest of the American Minister. While Captain Page was repairing his vessel as best he could, the Niaga
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
They were repulsed, and reembarked. December 27, 1864. Ensign Blume cuts out and takes from Galveston Harbor the blockade-running schooner Belle. January, 1865. January 15, 1865. Grand assault on Fort Fisher, which was captured with entire garrison. Union loss 110 killed, 536 wounded. Confed. loss 2500 prisoners, 72 guns. January 15, 1865. U. S. monitor Patapsco sunk by a Confed. torpedo in Charleston Harbor. 60 of the officers and crew were lost. January 23-24, 1865. Confed. ironclads attempt descent of the James, and are driven back. January 26, 1865. Steamer Eclipse explodes on the Tennessee River, killing 140 persons. February, 1865. February 4, 1865. Lieut. Cushing with 4 boats and 50 men takes possession of All Saints Parish, on Little River, S. C., capturing a large amount of cotton. February 18, 1865. Charleston occupied by Union forces. March, 1865. March 4, 1865. U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown