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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 553 553 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 14 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for February, 1865 AD or search for February, 1865 AD in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
eld in Charleston or Wilmington, where prices for goods not needed by the Confederate Government were run up to fabulous figures. The business of blockade-running was well organized abroad, especially in England. One successful trip was enough to start the enterprise with a handsome profit. A blockade-runner like the Kate, which made forty trips or more, would enrich her owners almost beyond the dreams of avarice. The remains of the Ruby soon after her capture by U. S. S. Proteus, February, 1865 Here on the beach of Morris Island lies all that was left of the swift and doughty blockade-runner Ruby. She was one of the most successful of her kind. She was busy early in 1862, plying between Nassau and Charleston. Not until February 27, 1865, while trying to get in with an assorted cargo of the type usually denominated hardware, was she at last entrapped. The Federal screw-steamer Proteus, Commander R. W. Shufeldt, picked up her scent and gave chase, with the result seen in t
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
can vessels were destroyed. Then she went south, swept the Gulf, and among her captures was the Federal war vessel Hatteras. The At Antwerp — U. S. S. Niagara and the fight that was not fought No sooner did it become known that the Stonewall was a broad than the Federal vessels in foreign waters began an active search for her. At the very beginning of her cruise she was found to have sprung a leak, however, and put into Ferrol, Spain, for repairs. There, during the first week in February, 1865, the frigate Niagara and the sloop-of-war Sacramento found her and attempted to blockade her. On March 24th the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and cleared for action. Commander T. T. Craven, of the Niagara, had already notified his Government that in a smooth sea the Stonweall would be a match for three such ships as the Niagara. Twice when the sea was rough he had stood out and offered battle to the Confederate ram, but Captain Page refused the offer, choosing his own time on a day w
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
1865. Grand assault on Fort Fisher, which was captured with entire garrison. Union loss 110 killed, 536 wounded. Confed. loss 2500 prisoners, 72 guns. January 15, 1865. U. S. monitor Patapsco sunk by a Confed. torpedo in Charleston Harbor. 60 of the officers and crew were lost. January 23-24, 1865. Confed. ironclads attempt descent of the James, and are driven back. January 26, 1865. Steamer Eclipse explodes on the Tennessee River, killing 140 persons. February, 1865. February 4, 1865. Lieut. Cushing with 4 boats and 50 men takes possession of All Saints Parish, on Little River, S. C., capturing a large amount of cotton. February 18, 1865. Charleston occupied by Union forces. March, 1865. March 4, 1865. U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown up by a torpedo in Cape Fear River. March 28-29, 1865. U. S. monitors Milwaukee and Osage sunk by torpedoes in Mobile Bay. April, 1865. April 8, 1865. Spanish Fort, Mo