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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
sault on Fort Fisher, which was captured with entire garrison. Union loss 110 killed, 536 wounded. Confed. loss 2500 prisoners, 72 guns. January 15, 1865. U. S. monitor Patapsco sunk by a Confed. torpedo in Charleston Harbor. 60 of the officers and crew were lost. January 23-24, 1865. Confed. ironclads attempt descent of the James, and are driven back. January 26, 1865. Steamer Eclipse explodes on the Tennessee River, killing 140 persons. February, 1865. February 4, 1865. Lieut. Cushing with 4 boats and 50 men takes possession of All Saints Parish, on Little River, S. C., capturing a large amount of cotton. February 18, 1865. Charleston occupied by Union forces. March, 1865. March 4, 1865. U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown up by a torpedo in Cape Fear River. March 28-29, 1865. U. S. monitors Milwaukee and Osage sunk by torpedoes in Mobile Bay. April, 1865. April 8, 1865. Spanish Fort, Mobile, bombarded. Th
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
., Sept. 19, 1862. Jordan, Thomas, April 14, 1862. Kelly, John H., Nov. 16, 1863. Kirkland, W. W., Aug. 29, 1863. Lane, James H., Nov. 1, 1862. Lane, Walter P., Mar. 17, 1865. Law, Evander M., Oct. 3, 1862. Lawton, Alex. R., April 13, 1861. Leadbetter, D., Feb. 27, 1862. Lee, Edwin G., Sept. 20, 1864. Lewis, Joseph H., Sept. 30, 1863. Liddell, St. J. R., July 12, 1862. Little, Henry, April 16, 1862. Logan, T. M., Feb. 15, 1865. Lowrey, Mark. P., Oct. 4, 1863. Lowry, Robert, Feb. 4, 1865. Lyon, Hylan B., June 14, 1864. McCausland, J., May 18, 1864. McComb, Wm., June 30, 1865. McCulloch, Hi. E., Mar. 14, 1862. McCullough, Ben., May 11, 1861. McGowan, S., Jan. 17, 1863. McIntosh, James, Jan. 21, 1862. McNair, Evander, Nov. 4, 1862. McRae, Dandridge, Nov. 5, 1862. Mackall, Wm. W., Feb. 27, 1862. Major, James P., July 21, 1863. Maney, George, April 16, 1862. Manigault, A. M., April 26, 1863. Marshall, H., Oct. 30, 1861. Martin, James G., May 15, 1862. Maxey, S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hardee and the Military operations around Atlanta. (search)
was known so fully to possess. The assignment of General Hardee to an independent and important command, which was simultaneous with his being relieved from duty with the Army of Tennessee, sufficiently evinces that my confidence in him had not been impaired; and his conduct in that separate command fully justified the opinion I continued to entertain. In this connection, it may be appropriate to furnish you with an extract from a letter written by me to General Beauregard on the 4th February, 1865--a period late in the course of the campaign through Eastern Georgia and South Carolina, and long after the events to which you refer: You will assume command of all the forces in the district as defined before your departure to the west; and should you deem it advisable, will direct General Hardee to assume the command of his old corps when it arrives, and add to it any other forces which may be advantageously associated with it. Thus it appears that in the hour of our direst need, I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aqueducts. (search)
e at Syracuse. The most famous Roman aqueducts were the Aqua Apia, 10 miles in length; the Aqua Martia, 60 miles; the Aqua Julia, 15 miles, and the Aqua Claudia, 46 miles. With the exception of the Claudia, all these were constructed before the birth of Christ. Among the most important aqueducts in the United States are the following: The old Croton, New York City, built 1837-42, length, 38 1/4 miles, capacity, 100 million gallons daily. The new Croton, built 1884-90, length 30 1/2 miles, capacity, 250 million gallons daily. Washington Aqueduct, built 1852-59, two 4-foot pipes. Boston, from Sudbury River, built 1875-78, length, 16 miles. Baltimore, from Gunpowder River, built 1875-81, length, 7 miles. The Sutro tunnel, 4 miles long, constructed to drain the Comstock Lode, Nevada, at a depth of 1,600 feet. It was chartered February 4, 1865, and completed June 30, 1879. Many important works for the purpose of irrigation are now under construction in the Western States of the Union.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sutro, Adolph Heinrich Joseph 1830-1898 (search)
Sutro, Adolph Heinrich Joseph 1830-1898 Mining engineer; born in Aix-la-Chapelle, Prussia, April 29, 1830; came to the United States in 1850; and later went to California, where he was in business for ten years; visited Nevada in 1860; learned of the unfavorable condition of the mines; and planned the great Sutro tunnel, through the heart of the mountain where lay the Comstock lode. He interested capitalists in the project; obtained a charter from the Nevada legislature, Feb. 4, 1865; and the authorization of Congress, July 25, 1866. The tunnel was begun Oct. 19, 1869; before the close of 1871 four vertical shafts had been opened along its line, one of which was 552 feet deep; and it was completed at a cost of nearly $4,000,000. The main tunnel is 1,650 feet from the surface, 20,000 feet long, 12 feet wide, and 10 feet high. Mr. Sutro sold his interest in the tunnel and went to San Francisco, where he invested in real estate, and became one of the richest men on the Pacific coa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nevada, (search)
he Carson River, containing pure rock-salt to a depth of 14 feet......1864 Under act of March 21, 1864, a convention to form a State constitution meets at Carson City, July 4; Nevada was admitted by proclamation......Oct. 31, 1864 Freemasonry established in the State in February, 1862, and the grand lodge of Nevada organized......January, 1865 Sutro Tunnel Company chartered to build a tunnel some 4 miles long to intersect and drain the Comstock lode at a depth of 1,600 feet......Feb. 4, 1865 Eastern boundary of Nevada extended one degree by act of Congress......May 5, 1866 First railroad locomotive enters the State, running from the California side to Crystal Peak......1867 United States Supreme Court declares unconstitutional an act of Nevada legislature levying a capitation tax of $1 on every person leaving the State by any railroad, stage-coach, or other carrier of passengers......1868 Legislature ratifies Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United S
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
ate Galatea, and they have kept me up so late that I cannot write as much as I would wish. I thought my last visit was, excepting dear Sergeant's Son of General Meade. sickness, most happy, but I cannot be happy and see my noble boy suffering as he does. I think of him all the time, and feel at times like asking to be relieved, that I may go home and help you nurse him. May God in his infinite mercy restore him to health, is my constant prayer! Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 4, 1865. I hear from Washington the vote on my confirmation was thirtytwo to five. I have not heard the names of my opponents, but their number is about what I expected, and I have no doubt they are all like Chandler, men whose opposition is rather creditable to you. As to the Peace Commissioners, I presume their arrival will make a great stir; I have written you what passed between us when I called on them. I understand they afterwards went down to Fortress Monroe, where they met, some
ta, Feb. 2d, 1865. Lieut.-Genl. W. J. Hardee, Charleston, S. C.: I have concluded to send Stevenson's forces to Branchville to-morrow. Can you furnish him with artillery? G. T. Beauregard. Augusta, Ga., Feb. 3d, 1865. Major-Genl. D. H. Hill, Green's Cut, Ga.: General Beauregard desires that you will send at once the brigade of Lee's corps now with you to this place, by rail, to report to General Stevenson. Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. Richmond, Va., Feb. 4th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Augusta, Ga.: * * * You will assume command of all the forces in the district as defined before your departure to the west, and should you deem it advisable will direct General Hardee to resume the command of his old corps when it arrives, and add to it any other forces which may be advantageously associated with it. * * * Jefferson Davis. Official. Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. Telegram. Carter's Ford, Feb. 4th, 1865:11 P. M. Genl. Beaureg
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Louisiana, 1865 (search)
to Grand RiverRHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry (Cos. "B," "L," "K"). Jan. 19-20: Scout from DonaldsonvilleRHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry (Detachment). Jan. 21-22: Exp. from Brashear City to Bayou SorrelWISCONSIN--11th Infantry (Co. "D"). Jan. 23: Skirmish, Thompson's PlantationRHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry. Loss, 1 wounded. Jan. 24: Skirmish, Bayou Goula(No Details.) Loss, 2 wounded, 12 missing. Total, 14. Jan. 26-Feb. 4: Exp. from Plaquemine to the ParkMASSACHUSETTS--31st Mounted Infantry (Detachment). Feb. 4: Skirmish, The ParkMASSACHUSETTS--31st Mounted Infantry (Detachment). Jan. 29-Feb. 7: Scouts from Bayou Goula to Grand RiverRHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry. Jan. 30: Skirmish, Richland PlantationRHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry. Jan. 30-31: Exp. from Thibodeaux to Lake Verret and Bayou PlantonLOUISIANA--1st Cavalry (Co. "K"). RHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry (Co. "H"). Jan. 30: Skirmish, Lake VerretLOUISIANA--1st Cavalry (Co. "K"). RHODE ISLAND--3d Cavalry (Co. "H"). Jan. 31: Exp. from Morganza to New RoadsNE
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, South Carolina, 1865 (search)
s, 18 killed, 70 wounded, 4 missing. Total, 92. Feb. 3: Skirmish, Dillingham's Cross Roads, or Duck BranchILLINOIS--Battery "H," 1st Light Arty.; 48th Infantry. Feb. 4: Skirmish, Wolf's PlantationIOWA--31st Infantry. Feb. 4: Skirmish, Angley's Post Office(No Reports.) Feb. 4: Skirmish, Buford's BridgeAdvance 1st Division, 15 CFeb. 4: Skirmish, Angley's Post Office(No Reports.) Feb. 4: Skirmish, Buford's BridgeAdvance 1st Division, 15 Corps. Feb. 5: Skirmish, Combahee Ferry(No Reports.) Feb. 5: Skirmish, Duncansville(No Reports.) Feb. 6: Action, Fishburn's Plantation, near Lane's Bridge, SalkehatchieILLINOIS--7th (Mounted) and 56th Infantry. IOWA--10th Infantry. MICHIGAN--Battery "B," 1st Light Arty. MISSOURI--29th (Mounted) Infantry. OHIO--80th Infantry. FeFeb. 4: Skirmish, Buford's BridgeAdvance 1st Division, 15 Corps. Feb. 5: Skirmish, Combahee Ferry(No Reports.) Feb. 5: Skirmish, Duncansville(No Reports.) Feb. 6: Action, Fishburn's Plantation, near Lane's Bridge, SalkehatchieILLINOIS--7th (Mounted) and 56th Infantry. IOWA--10th Infantry. MICHIGAN--Battery "B," 1st Light Arty. MISSOURI--29th (Mounted) Infantry. OHIO--80th Infantry. Feb. 6: Skirmish near BarnwellILLINOIS--92d (Mounted) Infantry. OHIO--9th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--10th Battery Light Arty. Feb. 6: Skirmish, Cowpens Ferry, Little Salkehatchie River(No Reports.) Feb. 7: Skirmish, BlackvilleINDIANA--8th Cavalry. KENTUCY--2d and 3d Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. Feb. 7: Skirmish, Edisto R. R. Brid
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