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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
864, and lost his life while in command there on the 20th of July, 1864; he was succeeded by another brave officer, Captain T. A. Huguenin, who was fortunate enough to escape uninjured and only left the fort at its final evacuation on the 17th of February, 1865. Another gallant officer, Major John Johnson, of the Confederate States Engineers, was of much assistance in the defense of the ruins, and remained therein while they were held by us. The instructions for the evacuation of Batteries W553 mortar-shells. The total number of projectiles thrown by the land-batteries against Fort Sumter up to September 7th was 6451, and against Battery Wagner, from July 26th to September 7th, 9875, making in all 16,326. And yet only Wagner was taken. Sumter, though a mass of ruins, remained ours to the last, and Charleston was evacuated by the Confederate troops near the close of the war, namely, on the 17th of February, 1865, and. then only to furnish additional men to the army in the field.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate defense of Fort Sumter. (search)
lt, and even supporting the other works at the entrance of Charleston harbor with six guns of the heaviest caliber. Thus it was not until February, 1865, a few months only before the war came to an end, that General Sherman's march through the interior of South Carolina obliged the withdrawal of Confederate garrisons and troops from Charleston and its vicinity. I had been sent elsewhere on duty, and was glad to be spared the leave-taking that fell to others. On the night of the 17th of February, 1865, the commander, Captain Thomas A. Huguenin, silently and without interruption effected the complete evacuation. He has often told me of the particulars, and I have involuntarily accompanied him in thought and feeling as, for the last time, he went the rounds of the deserted fort. The ordered casemates with their massive guns were there, but in the stillness of that hour his own footfall alone gave an echo from the arches overhead. The labyrinthine galleries, as he traversed them,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
a silly Roman stoicism, but from folly and want of sense, in filling it with lint, cotton, and tinder. Our officers and men on duty worked well to extinguish the flames; but others not on duty, including the officers, who had long been imprisoned there, rescued by us, may have assisted in spreading the fire after it had once begun, and may have indulged in unconcealed joy to see the ruin of the capital of South Carolina. Major Nichols, in his Story of the Great March, under date of Feb. 17, 1865 (page 166), says: Various causes are assigned to explain the origin of the fire. I am quite sure that it originated in sparks, flying from the hundreds of bales of cotton which the Rebels had placed along the middle of the main street, and fired as they left the city. Fire from a tightly compressed bale of cotton is unlike that of a more open material, which burns itself out. The fire lies smoldering in a bale of cotton after it appears to be extinguished, and in this instance, when ou
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
Feb. 18, 1864   Steamer Tom Sugg 7,000 00 4,027 70 2,972 30 Springfield April 12, 1864 Cricket. Ship Thomas Watson Waiting for prize list of the Roanoke and Flag. 656 88 535 67 121 21 New York   Roanoke, Flag.   Turpentine, 11 barrels 1,119 30 127 11 992 19 Key West June 1, 1864 Sagamore. Schooner Thomas C. Worrell Waiting for prize list of the Jacob Bell. 514 40 137 93 376 47 Washington   Wyandank, Jacob Bell.   Tobacco, 2 hogsheads 708 66 156 44 552 22 Springfield Feb. 17, 1865 Key West. Steamer Tristram Shandy 418,873 81 6,801 26 412,072 55 Boston Oct. 10, 1864 Kansas. Steamer Thistle 163,392 90 2,539 07 160,853 83 do Jan. 14, 1865 Fort Jackson. Schooner Three Brothers 1,638 87 193 59 1,445 28 Key West Mar. 22, 1865 Nita. Schooner Terrapin 697 58 183 23 514 35 do Aug. 25, 1865 Roebuck. Schooner Two Brothers 75 75 75 75   do No proceeds. Roebuck. Sloop Theodora 140 00 94 83 45 20 do   Hibiscus. (Waiting for prize list.) Sloop Telemaco 3,43
turn it entered the Atlanta campaign, the Iowa Brigade serving as the Third Brigade of Gresham's (4th) Division, Seventeenth Corps. At the battle of Atlanta--July 21st and 22d--the regiment, under Colonel Shane, was in the thickest of the fight, losing 247 in killed, wounded and missing, out of 410 present for duty; Major Wm. A. Walker, a gallant officer, was killed in the second day's fight. The regiment marched through Georgia to the Sea, and was the first to enter Columbia, S. C. (February 17, 1865), its colors being the first to wave over the State Capitol. Fifteenth Iowa Infantry. Iowa Brigade--McArthur's Division--Seventeenth Corps. (1) Col. Hugh T. Reid; Brig.-Gen. (2) Col. William W. Belknap; Brig.-Gen. (3) Col. John M. Hedrick, Bvt. Brig.-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 1   1   1 1 15 Company A 2 11 13   25 25 145
ege of Charleston an exceptional place in military annals. Thus spoke the expert of the French Journal of military science in 1865, only a few months after this attack and defense had passed into history. Charleston was never captured. It was evacuated only after Sherman's advance through the heart of South Carolina had done what over five hundred and fifty-seven days of continuous attack and siege by the Federal army and navy could not do — make it untenable. When, on the night of February 17, 1865, Captain H. Huguenin, lantern in hand, made his last silent rounds of the deserted Fort and took the little boat for shore, there ended the four years defense of Fort Sumter, a feat of war unsurpassed in ancient or modern times — eclipsing (says an English military critic) such famous passages as Sale's defense of Jellalabad against the Afghans and Havelock's obdurate tenure of the residency at Lucknow. Charleston with its defenses--Forts Sumter, Moultrie, Wagner, and Castle Pinckney
ege of Charleston an exceptional place in military annals. Thus spoke the expert of the French Journal of military science in 1865, only a few months after this attack and defense had passed into history. Charleston was never captured. It was evacuated only after Sherman's advance through the heart of South Carolina had done what over five hundred and fifty-seven days of continuous attack and siege by the Federal army and navy could not do — make it untenable. When, on the night of February 17, 1865, Captain H. Huguenin, lantern in hand, made his last silent rounds of the deserted Fort and took the little boat for shore, there ended the four years defense of Fort Sumter, a feat of war unsurpassed in ancient or modern times — eclipsing (says an English military critic) such famous passages as Sale's defense of Jellalabad against the Afghans and Havelock's obdurate tenure of the residency at Lucknow. Charleston with its defenses--Forts Sumter, Moultrie, Wagner, and Castle Pinckney
of which the outside is shown above. The skill with which gabions were employed to strengthen the ramparts is apparent. A description of the relinquishment of the position follows in the words of Major John Johnson: On the night of the 17th of February, 1865, the commander, Captain Thomas A. Huguenin, silently and without interruption effected the complete evacuation. He has often told me of the particulars, and I have involuntarily accompanied him in thought and feeling as, for the last tim. February 11, 1865: sugar Loaf Battery, Federal Point, N. C. Union, Portions of Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Corps; Confed., Gen. Hoke's command. Losses: Union, 14 killed, 114 wounded. Confed. No record found. February 16-17, 1865: Columbia, S. C. Union, Fifteenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Major-General John A. Logan; Confed., troops of Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 20 killed and wounded; Confed. No record found. February 18-
the best-fortified city on the Confederate sea-coast, and proved a stumbling-block to both the Federal army and navy. Fort Moultrie was on Sullivan's Island, guarding the righthand entrance to the harbor. Charleston was finally evacuated February 17, 1865, after Sherman's march to the sea. One of the most powerful guns of the Confederacy, in Fort Moultrie Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg. These two forts were captured successively in the slow approach by parallels along Morris Islandhe battery directly in front of the public square. Charleston was the birthplace of secession, and was prepared to make a stout defense. Sumter almost single-handed held out until inland communications were cut, and the city was evacuated February 17, 1865. The giant Blakely gun at Charleston. This was an English gun, all steel, to which the principle of initial tension was successfully applied. From the breech to the trunnions of the Blakely gun it was pear-shaped, for the purpose
nly served this purpose, but kept flying pieces of the more solid construction which they reinforced from maiming the garrison. One would hardly imagine that the declivity in the center of the mass of gabions had once been a well-chiseled flight of steps. This kind of fortification deteriorated very rapidly unless constantly repaired. In Sumter the work of repairing was particularly heavy, following one bombardment after another throughout the four years of the war. It was not until February 17, 1865, after Sherman's great march, that the Fort was evacuated. covered with earth. Without timber, the parapets were often made as much as fifteen feet thick, to stop artillery fire. A head log, under which the men could fire, was frequently utilized. When struck by a large projectile, of course a log in that position was liable to be thrown backward and injure a number of men. Various methods were used to prevent its coming back, and one device, to prevent injury to the men in case i
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