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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for February 18th, 1865 AD or search for February 18th, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
hey started out, no man knew what would be the result of an expedition until it was over, or what force was likely to be encountered. The enemy, knowing the adventurous spirit of the officers of the squadron, might set a trap for them, and, instead of getting a load of cotton, they might get a load of grapeshot. The Confederates had fitted out a privateer or vessel-of-war, or whatever name that class of vessel might be recognized under — an armed schooner, the Anna Dale,--which, on February 18. 1865, was lying in Pass Cavallo, Texas, waiting for part of her crew, when she intended to slip out to prey on Federal commerce. This vessel had been observed for several days apparently watching an opportunity to get to sea when the wind favored her. Lieutenant-Commander Henry Erben, Jr., of the Panola, had been watching her closely, and at night kept picket-boats close to the inlet to see that she did not slip out without due notice from the boats. On the night of the 18th he sent in tw
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
n General Lee surrendered at Appomattox the work of the North Atlantic Squadron was over, for all the James River region was in the hands of the Federals. Up to that time the squadron in Trent's Reach was quietly holding the Confederate iron-clads, under the command of Raphael Semmes-recently created Rear-Admiral--above Drury's Bluff, where they were quite harmless and would either have to be blown up or surrendered. Admiral Semmes assumed command of the James River fleet on the 18th of February, 1865, relieving Commodore J. K. Mitchell. The fleet as reorganized comprised the following named vessels: Virginia (iron-clad), flag-ship, four guns, Captain Dunnington; Richmond (iron-clad), four guns, Captain J. D. Johnson; son; Fredericksburg (iron-clad), four guns, Captain Glasse; Hampton (wooden), two guns, Captain Wilson (late of the Alabama); Nansemond (wooden), two guns, Captain W. K. Butt; Roanoke (wooden) two guns, Captain Polloc; Beaufort (wooden), two guns, Captain Wyatt;
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
little respect for their obligations as neutrals. Their ruling sentiment was hatred to the United States Government and people. This was shown in the early mining days of 1852, when the British Government gave American merchant vessels the privilege of trading on the Australian coast on the same terms as were accorded to those of Great Britain; but the colonists placed so many restrictions on United States vessels, steam-ships especially, that the latter were driven away. On the 18th February, 1865, the Shenandoah proceeded under sail to the vicinity of Behring's Straits, where a large number of whaling vessels were captured and destroyed. Until the 28th of June, the ocean was ablaze with burning ships, whose crews were subjected to very inhuman treatment. Waddell continued his operations for over two months after hostilities between the North and South had terminated, professing that he had no intimation of the surrender of the Confederate armies until the date above mentioned