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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 438 438 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 57 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 9 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
ivil war in America have ever comprehended the importance of the movement of my army northward from Savannah to Goldsboro‘, or of the transfer of Schofield from Nashville to cooperate with me in North Carolina. This march was like the thrust of a sword toward the heart of the human body; each mile of advance swept aside all opposition, consumed the very food on which Lee's army depended for life, and demonstrated a power in the National Government which was irresistible. Therefore, in March, 1865, but one more move was left to Lee on the chessboard of war: to abandon Richmond; make junction with Johnston in North Carolina; fall on me and destroy me if possible — a fate I did not apprehend; then turn on Grant, sure to be in close pursuit, and defeat him. 3ut no! Lee clung to his intrenchments for political reasons, and waited for the inevitable. At last, on the 1st day of April, General Sheridan, by his vehement and most successful attack on the Confederate lines at the Five Fork
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. by Professor James Russell Soley, U. S. N. In the operations against Mobile, in March and April, 1865, the navy bore its full share of the work, and met with heavy losses. The West Gulf squadron, after Farragut's retirement from the command in September, 1864, had been under the direction of Commodore James S. Palmer, who was in turn relieved at the end of February by Acting Rear-Admiral Henry K. Thatcher. Palmer, however, an officer of great energy and skill, continued to serve with the squadron. Admiral Thatcher took personal direction of the closing operations against Mobile in cooperation with General Canby. His force included among other vessels the iron-clads Cincinnati, Winnebago, Chickasaw, Milwaukee, Osage, and Kickapoo. Among the wooden vessels were the double-enders Genesee, Sebago, Octorara, and Metacomet, the gun-boats Itasca and Sciota, the tin-clads Rodolph, Elk, Meteor, Tallahatchie, Nyanza, and Stockdale (f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
n driven by the need of repairs to seek the hospitality of the port. She was allowed to enter, but placed under close observation. After much discussion, the French Government decided that it would place no obstacle in the way of her departure, but would allow no increase of the crew or the supply of warlike equipment, and a French gun-boat was anchored close by to enforce the prohibition. No further attempt was made to remove the vessel, and she remained at Calais as a depot ship. In March, 1865, Barron turned her over to Bulloch, and an attempt was made to sell her; but as the Confederacy had now come to an end, Bulloch could give no legal title, and the ship was eventually delivered to the United States. In the latter part of 1862 a new cruiser, of the same type as the Florida, was projected by the Confederate agents in Liverpool. She was launched on the 7th of March, 1863, and was called the Alexandra. The suspicions of Mr. Dudley, United States consul at Liverpool, were