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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 438 438 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 57 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
field hospitals.) But these pages have nothing to do with the prison question other than the statistics. The principal place of confinement for Union soldiers was at Andersonville, Ga. Out of 45,613 prisoners confined there, 12,912 died — or, 28 per cent. The greatest number present at any time was 33,114--on August 8, 1864. The greatest number of deaths in any one day was 127--on August 23, 1864. The daily average of deaths was 29 3/4. The largest military prison in the North was located at Elmira, N. Y. As at Andersonville, it consisted of an open stockade or prison pen. In it were confined 11,916 prisoners, of whom 2,994 died, or 25 per cent. The greatest mortality occurred in March, 1865, in which month 495 died at Elmira. Of the total number that died, 2,988 were buried in a field which has since been ploughed over and planted with wheat; and now the grain of summer and the snow of winter show no sign of the hapless Confederates who are laid at rest beneath its surface
, were detached and ordered on the Fort Fisher expedition. After the brilliant capture of Fort Fisher by these troops, they remained in North Carolina, and, in March, 1865, the Tenth Corps was revived. As reorganized, it consisted of Birge's (1st) Division, composed of three brigades taken from Grover's Division of the Nineteenthond Division having arrived at Savannah, General Grover was assigned to the command of the district, and General H. W. Birge to the command of the division. In March, 1865, Birge's Division, containing three brigades, eighteen regiments, was ordered to North Carolina, where it was attached temporarily to the Tenth Corps and was decCook's, Hatch's, Johnson's and Knipe's — were present. After the defeat and dismemberment of Hood's Army, Wilson entered Alabama with his corps of troopers in March, 1865, and there fought the closing battles of the war. His four divisions were there commanded by Generals McCook, Hatch, Long and Upton. Although the last infantry
  2 Poplar Spring Church, Va.   1   1 Boydton Road, Va. 1 7   8 Hatcher's Run, Va., March, 1865 1 3   4 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 6 34 1 41   Totals 142 807 268 1,217 Pres The enrollment includes 303 men, transferred from the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania, in March, 1865, after the fighting had ended. Total of killed and wounded, 549. battles. K. & M. W.ment given above being the number enrolled up to that time; three new companies were added in March, 1865. As an acknowledgment of the superior qualities of the Battalion, it was furnished, in 1864,g. In November, 1864, the corps marched with Sherman through Georgia to the sea, and then in March, 1865, through the Carolinas. At Bentonville, the last battle of the Fourtenth Corps, the divisioncum's Expedition against Jackson, Miss. On July 29, 1864, it moved to Morganzia, La., and in March, 1865, it was engaged in the siege operations about Mobile, and in the fighting at Fort Blakely. I<