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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 438 438 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 57 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 57 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 (search)
Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 Military engineer: born in Kentucky in 1819; was graduated at the Military Academy at West Point in 1842. He was made second lieutenant of engineers in 1843, and captain in 1856. For services at the battle of Bull Run. July, 186;1, he was brevetted major, and in March, 1863, was commissioned major of the engineer corps. For meritorious services during the Civil War, he was brevetted brigadier-general in March, 1865. Active during the war, he was consulting engineer in Sheridan's army in the Shenandoah Valley, and was at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. After the war he spent two years in charge of the construction of public works in Maine. He died in San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 15, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
arranged in a line extending from Staunton to Newport to intercept the raider. He dashed through this line at Covington in the face of some opposition, destroyed the bridges behind him, and one of his regiments, which had been cut off from the rest, swam the stream and joined the others, with the loss of four men drowned. Averill captured during the raid about 200 men. My command, he said in his report (Dec. 21, 1863), has marched, climbed, slid, and swam 340 miles since the 8th inst. He reported a loss of six men drowned, five wounded, and ninety missing. He performed gallant service under Hunter, Sigel, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864; and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. The same year he resigned his commission of captain in the regular army. He was consul-general at Montreal in 1866-69. In 1888, by special act of Congress, he was reappointed a captain in the army, and soon afterwards was retired. He died in Bath, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ayres, Romeyn Beck, 1825-1888 (search)
Ayres, Romeyn Beck, 1825-1888 Military officer; born in East Creek, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1825; was graduated at West Point in 1847. He served in the artillery in the war with Mexico, and commanded a battery in the battle of Bull Run. In October, 1861, he became chief of artillery of Gen. W. F. Smith's division, and soon afterwards of the 6th Corps. He was in the campaign on the Peninsula, and the chief battles afterwards in Virginia and Maryland. He served with distinction through the Richmond campaign of 1864-605; was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865; promoted to colonel of the 3d Artillery. July 18, 1879; and died in Fort Hamilton, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Badeau, Adam, 1831-1895 (search)
Badeau, Adam, 1831-1895 Military officer; born in New York, Dec. 29, 1831; served on the staff of General Sherman early in the Civil War; was severely wounded at Port Hudson; joined General Grant, and became his military secretary, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, in January, 1864; and was made aide-de-camp to the general of the army, with the title of colonel, in March, 1865; and retired in 1869, holding the rank of captain, U. S. C., and brevet brigadier-general, U. S. V. He was consul-general in London in 1870-81; accompanied General Grant on his journey around the world in 1877-78; and was consul-general in Havana in 1882-84. After General Grant's death Badeau lost a suit against the heirs for compensation for alleged services in the preparation of General Grant's Memoirs. He published Military history of Ulysscs S. Grant; Grant in peace, and several romances. He died in Ridgewood, N. J., March 19, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baird, Absalom, 1824- (search)
Baird, Absalom, 1824- Military officer; born in Washington, Pa., Aug. 20, 1824; was graduated at West Point in 1849, having studied law before he entered the military academy. He was ordered to Washington, Bainbridge's monument. D. C., in March, 1861, and in May was made assistant adjutant-general. He became aide to General Tyler in the battle of Bull Run, and in November was made assistant inspector-general, with the rank of major. In March, 1862, he became General Keys's chief of staff; and in April he was made brigadier-general of volunterrs, and sent to Kentucky. He commanded a division under General Granger in April, 1863, and was afterwards active in northern Georgia and in the Atlanta campaign. In Sherman's march to the sea he commanded a division of the 14th Army Corps, and also in the advance through the Carolinas. He was brevetted major-general, U. S. A., in March, 1865; promoted brigadier-general and inspector-general in 1885; and retired in 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 Military engineer: born in Sheffield, Mass., May 19, 1815; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1833, and entered the engineer corps. He was made captain in 1838; major in 1858; brevet brigadier-general of volunteers in 1861; lieutenant-colonel of regulars in 1863; brevet major-general of volunteers in 1864; brevet brigadier-general and brevet major-general of regulars, March, 1865; and colonel of the corps of engineers, regular army, Dec. 28, the same year. During the war with Mexico he fortified Tampico, and made surveys of the battle-fields around the capital. In 1850-51 he was chief engineer of the projected Tehuantepec Railroad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the fiel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnes, James, 1866-1869 (search)
Barnes, James, 1866-1869 author: born in Annapolis, Md., Sept. 19, 1866; was graduated at Princeton College in 1891: author Of naval actions of 1812; For King or country; A loyal traitor; Midshipman Farragut, etc. military officer; born in Boston, Mass., about 1809); was graduated at West Point in 1829, and resigned in 1836. He became colonel of a Massachusetts volunteer regiment in 1861, and in November of that year was made brigadier-general in the Army of the Potomac, participating in its most exciting operations. He commanded a division at the battle of Gettysburg, and was severely wounded. He was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865, and was mustered out of the service Jan. 15, 1866. He died in Springfield, Mass., Feb. 12, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benham, Henry W., 1817-1884 (search)
Benham, Henry W., 1817-1884 Military officer; born in Cheshire, Conn., in 1817; was graduated at West Point, first in his class, in 1837. He served under General Taylor in the war with Mexico, and was wounded in the battle of Buena. Vista. Early in the Civil War he was active in western Virginia, and afterwards on the South Carolina coast. He assisted in the capture of Fort Pulaski; and in 1863-64 he commanded an engineer brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He was brevetted brigadier-general for services in the campaign ending with the surrender of Lee, and major-general (March, 1865) for meritorious services in the rebellion. He died in New York, June 1, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, John, 1825- (search)
61. He commanded a brigade of cavalry under General Hooker, and was so severely wounded near the Rappahannock (August, 1862) that he was reported dead. In the battle of Antietam he was on General McClellan's staff. He was conspicuous in many engagements while in command of the reserve cavalry brigade, and he began the battle of Gettysburg (q. v.). He was chief of Burnside's cavalry, and was assigned to the command of the Army of the Cumberland just before his death in Washington, D. C., Dec. 16, 1863.--His half-brother, Napoleon Bonaparte Buford (born in Woodford county, Ky., Jan. 13, 1807), was also graduated at West Point, and entered the artillery. He was a pupil in the Law School of Harvard University; Professor of Natural Philosophy at West Point; but retired to civil pursuits in 1835. Engaging first as colonel in the Union army in 1861, he served well during the continuance of the strife, and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. He died March 28, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Casey, Silas 1807-1882 (search)
Casey, Silas 1807-1882 Military officer; born in East Greenwich, R. I., July 12, 1807; was graduated at West Point in 1826; served with Worth in Florida (1837-41) and under Scott in the war with Mexico (1847-48) ; was also in the operations against the Indians on the Pacific coast in 1856. Early in the Civil War he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and organized and disciplined the volunteers at and near Washington. He was made major-general of volunteers in May, 1862, and commanded a division in General Keyes's corps on the Peninsula, and received the first attack of the Confederates in the battle of fair Oaks (q. v.). General Casey was brevetted major-general U. S. A. in March, 1865, for meritorious service during the rebellion, and the legislature of Rhode Island gave him a vote of thanks in 1867. He was author of a System of Infantry tactics (1861) and Infantry tactics for colored troops (1863). He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1882.
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