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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 438 438 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 57 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 9 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
h King, Ober S. Wilber, John Hanscom, and Theodore Dean were chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 1864. At the annual town-meeting held March 7th, an appropriation was made for the payment of State aid; and on the 4th of April the town voted to continue recruiting, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town; this to continue until March, 1865. Another town-meeting was held on the 30th of July, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to men who enlist in the navy. This was continued until the end of the war. Raynham, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished two hundred and nine men for the war, which we regard as about fifteen more than was actually credited, as at the end of the war the town had, after filling its quota upon every call made, a surplus of eighteen men. Four wer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
selectmen were directed to enlist twenty men as soon as possible, to answer for any future call of the President up to March, 1865. 1865. March 6th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars each to five re-enlisted veterans. e years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. The selectmen were authorized to pay the same until March, 1865; also, to borrow five hundred dollars, to be used in aiding the families of volunteers. Charlemont furnished one huuota, and fifteen hundred dollars to refund subscriptions. The selectmen were authorized to continue recruiting until March, 1865; to pay to each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and to borrow money for that purpose. May ed and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the town previous to March, 1865. A similar vote was passed on the 4th of June. Whately, according to a return made by the selectmen in 1866, furni
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
own. August 15th, Voted, to pay the bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars in gold; and the selectmen were authorized to enlist as many men as they may think necessary to fill the quota of the town on any call that may be made prior to March, 1865, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the money to pay the same. Carlisle furnished seventy-four men for the war, which was a surplus of two over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appr 1864. April 23d, Voted, to raise four hundred and fifty dollars to reimburse individual citizens who had contributed money to fill the quota of the town in 1863, and the selectmen were authorized to keep on recruiting to fill any quota until March, 1865; the bounty not to exceed one hundred dollars. 1865. November 7th, Voted, to refund the money paid by subscription in 1864 for the purpose of filling the town's quota under the call of the President, June 16th, 1864. Dunstable furnished
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
authorizing the treasurer to borrow money to pay bounties and furnish aid to the families of soldiers. December 12th, Dudley Keach, George D. Heaton, and James P. Thayer were appointed by the town to assist the selectmen in recruiting men, and four hundred dollars were appropriated to pay expenses. 1864. April 16th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money, and recruiting was to continue until March, 1865. 1865. July 1st, Voted, to refund all money contributed by individuals to pay bounties and encourage recruiting; the same to be assessed within three years. Bellingham furnished one hundred and forty men for the war, which was a surplus of nine over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand and twenty-five dollars and sixty-one cents ($16
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
nteer enlisting to the credit of the town for three years service. September 1st, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men enlisting for nine months and credited to the quota of the town. 1863. There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in regard to the war. 1864. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to the credit of the town for three years previous to March, 1865. Plympton furnished ninety-six men for the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. Seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for military purposes, exclusive of State aid, was six thousand four hundred and ninety-one dollars and eighty-five cents ($6,491.85). The further sum of seventeen hundred and eighty-eight dollars was raised by private subscription to aid recruiting. The amount of money paid by the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
rs for nine months service. 1863. April 7th, The treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, was authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to soldiers' families during the year. Voted, that the town assume and pay the debt wherein extra bounties have been paid, together with expenses of recruiting in 1862. 1864. April 4th, The selectmen were instructed to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the town until March, 1865, the number not to exceed the town's quota. The treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 1865. June 26th, Voted, to raise by tax sufficient money to reimburse individuals for money advanced by them to aid in procuring recruits to fill the quota of the town in 1864. Dana furnished eighty-three men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money app