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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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ever on one side and all the wrong on the other.—James Ford Rhodes in History of the United States. From first to last, omitting the armies surrendered during April and May, 1865, more than four hundred thousand prisoners were confined for periods ranging from days to years. At the beginning of the war no suitable provision wnd Confederate prisoners is due to the inclusion in the Confederate number of the armies surrendered by Lee, Johnston, Taylor, and Kirby Smith during the months of April and May, 1865. There are other estimates which differ very widely from this, which is probably as nearly correct as possible, owing to the partial destruction of hese figures. Of course, this large number of Confederates captured includes the armies of Lee, Johnston, Taylor, and Kirby Smith surrendered during the months of April and May, 1865. This report is probably as nearly correct as can be made, owing to the partial destruction of records, though it differs very widely from two oth
John F. Iverson held command of the prison, and his kindness and humanity have A Confederate prison in Petersburg, April, 1865 This prison in Petersburg was known as Castle Thunder. When this photograph was taken, in April, 1865, for many moApril, 1865, for many months Confederate sentries had been pacing up and down where the Union sentry now stands with his gun at support arms. For months a succession of Union prisoners had gazed out longingly through the bars, listening to the Union guns which day after dmanity could not be carried out. Libby prison after the war—ruins in the foreground This photograph was taken in April, 1865, after the city had passed into the hands of the Federals. The near-by buildings had been destroyed, and the foregroubles were turned Confederate prisoners confined in the Southern stronghold In this dramatic record by the camera of April, 1865, appear Confederate captives pressing their faces against the bars through which one hundred and twenty-five thousand
human mole is to bore upward; the tunnel came to the top too soon on the near side of the fence. It was finally completed into the lot. But on the very night that the prisoners planned to escape, the news became known to their fellows. Men fought like demons in the close, dark cellar to be the next to crawl into the narrow hole. About a hundred of them got away before the noise attracted the attention of the guards. The fence was immediately destroyed, as appears by this photograph of April, 1865. many prisons—prisoners have been known to saw through a heavy stockade. In one instance, at City Point, a North Carolinian sawed through a wall six inches thick and made a hole. He and a number of his companions had provided canteens which they had tightly corked for use as floats. All in the secret passed through the hole and into the waters of the bay, except the man who had sawed the hole, who, waiting courteously until all his friends had passed, found that some one had appropria
uring the last months of the war a number of Federal prisoners were confined in Charleston while the town was being bombarded by the Federals from their stronghold on Morris Island. In retaliation, six hundred Confederate officers were sent from Fort Delaware and placed in a stockade on Morris Island under the fire of the Confederate guns. Little or no damage was done on either side. This is a photograph of the O'Connor house in Charleston, used as an officers' prison. It was taken in April, 1865, after the occupation of the city by the Federal forces. The building in front of the O'Connor house is in ruins, but there are no marks of shells visible on the O'Connor house itself. Now that the fierce heat of war has passed, it has been admitted that it would have been impossible to keep prisoners anywhere in Charleston without exposing them to the bombardment, since that covered the entire city. attended a number of exchanged Federal prisoners confined upon Belle Isle reported tha
The medical service of the Confederacy Deering J. Roberts, M. D., Surgeon, Confederate States Army Destruction in Richmond. Why the author of the following chapter must rely on memory and private sources. —destruction in Richmond, April, 1865 reaching almost to the Capitol itself (in the rear of the picture), and consuming medical and other official records. in the conflagration in the city of Richmond, Virginia, on the night of April 2, 1865, on its occupation by the Federal a nurses in the window, with their old-fashioned black mittens, may be held responsible for the bird-cage hanging by the door. Neither they nor the chubby little boy sitting on the sidewalk in the foreground suggest war; yet this is a scene of April, 1865, before Lee's surrender. It is well-nigh impossible for a man surrounded by the sights and sounds and scents of every-day civilian life to realize what a touch of femininity meant to a sick soldier far from home after four years of rough camp
The medical service of the Confederacy Deering J. Roberts, M. D., Surgeon, Confederate States Army Destruction in Richmond. Why the author of the following chapter must rely on memory and private sources. —destruction in Richmond, April, 1865 reaching almost to the Capitol itself (in the rear of the picture), and consuming medical and other official records. in the conflagration in the city of Richmond, Virginia, on the night of April 2, 1865, on its occupation by the Federal army, two houses with their contents were completely destroyed; one occupied by Surgeon-General Samuel P. Moore as his office, and the one adjoining, in which were stored many papers, reports, and records pertaining to his office, and which had accumulated during the preceding four years. While much has been placed on the printed page during the past forty years, including the numerous octavo volumes under the title of The War of the Rebellion, and the larger but less numerous ones entitled The
from commutation of rations. The total number of patients received and treated at Chimborazo Hospital amounted to seventy-six thousand (out of this number about Officers and nurses at seminary hospital, Georgetown, April 1, 1865 The two neat nurses in the window, with their old-fashioned black mittens, may be held responsible for the bird-cage hanging by the door. Neither they nor the chubby little boy sitting on the sidewalk in the foreground suggest war; yet this is a scene of April, 1865, before Lee's surrender. It is well-nigh impossible for a man surrounded by the sights and sounds and scents of every-day civilian life to realize what a touch of femininity meant to a sick soldier far from home after four years of rough campaigning. A chaplain was attached to most of these hospitals; his duties, besides those of a spiritual nature, having to do with correspondence with friends and relatives, supervision over the postal service, reading-room, library, amusements, etc. T