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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 19 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
ml. B. MooreMar. 1831 to Nov. 1831 John GayleNov. 1831 to Nov. 1835 Clement C. ClayNov. 1835 to July, 1837 Hugh McVayJuly, 1837 to Nov. 1837 Arthur P. BagbyNov. 1837 to Nov. 1841 Benj. FitzpatrickNov. 1841 to Nov. 1845 Joshua L. MartinNov. 1845 to Nov. 1847 Reuben ChapmanNov. 1847 to Nov. 1849 Henry Watkins CollierNov. 1849 to Nov. 1853 John A. WinstonNov. 1853 to Nov. 1857 Andrew B. MooreNov. 1857 to Nov. 1861 John Gill ShorterNov. 1861 to Nov. 1863 Thomas H. WattsNov. 1863 to Apr. 1865 Interregnum of two months. Lewis E. ParsonsJune. 1865 to Dec. 1865 Robt. M. PattonDec. 1865 to July, 1868 Wm. H. SmithJuly, 1868 to Nov. 1870 Robt. B. LindsayNov. 1870 to Nov. 1872 David B. LewisNov. 1872 to Nov. 1874 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1874 to Nov. 1876 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1876 to Nov. 1878 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1878 to Nov. 1880 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1880 to Nov. 1882 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1882 to Nov. 1884 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1884 to Nov. 1886 Thomas SeayNov. 1886 to Nov. 1888 T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
1865; and colonel of the corps of engineers, regular army, Dec. 28, the same year. During the war with Mexico he fortified Tampico, and made surveys of the battle-fields around the capital. In 1850-51 he was chief engineer of the projected Tehuantepec Railroad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field on General Grant's staff, from May, 1864, until Lee's surrender at Appomattox in April, 1865. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general, U. S. A. He published The Gyroscopc and Problems in rotary motions, which evince profound mathematical investigation; also other works concerning the Civil War and its operations. The degree of Ll.D. was conferred upon him by Yale College. He died in Detroit, Mich., May 14, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 (search)
in 1853, and remained four years. He resigned his seat in the Senate in January, 1861, and was chosen provisional President of the Southern Confederacy in February. In November, 1861, he was elected permanent President for six years. Early in April, 1865, he and his associates in the government fled from Richmond, first to Danville, Va., and then towards the Gulf of Mexico. He was arrested in Georgia, taken to Fort Monroe, and confined on a charge of treason for about two years, when he was rted States, or the person or cargo on board of her, such person would be held amenable to the laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy. With this opposing proclamation the great Civil War was actively begun. In April, 1865, Mr. Davis's wife and children, and his wife's sister, had accompanied him from Danville to Washington, Ga., where, for prudential reasons, the father separated from the others. He soon learned that some Confederate soldiers, believing that t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dearing, James, 1840- (search)
Dearing, James, 1840- Soldier; born in Campbell county, Va., April 25, 1840; graduated at Hanover Academy; became a cadet at West Point, but at the outbreak of the Civil War resigned to join the Confederate army, in which he gained the rank of brigadier-general. He took part in the principal engagements between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, and was mortally wounded in a singular encounter with Brig.-Gen. Theodore Read, of the National army. The two generals at the head of their respective forces met on opposite sides of the Appomattox in April, 1865, and in a pistol fight which ensued Read was shot dead and Dearing was so severely wounded that he died soon afterwards in Lynchburg, Va.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Trobriand, Philippe ReGis, 1816-1897 (search)
De Trobriand, Philippe ReGis, 1816-1897 Military officer; born in Chateau des Rochettes, France, June 4, 1816; came to the United States in 1841; joined the National army as colonel of the 55th New York Regiment in August, 1861; took part in the engagements at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, etc.; was present as the commander of a division at Lee's surrender; received the brevet of majorgeneral of volunteers in April, 1865. He joined the regular army in 1866; received the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867; retired in 1879. He published Quatre ans de campagnes à l'armee du Potomac. He died in Bayport, L. I., July 7, 1897
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Devens, Charles, 1820- (search)
as engaged in his profession at Worcester, Mass., when the Civil War began, and was one of the earliest Union volunteers, becoming major of a rifle battalion April 16, 1861, and colonel of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment in July following. Before the arrival of Colonel Baker, he commanded at Ball's Bluff (q. v.)and again after that officer's death. In April, 1862, he was made brigadier-general; served on the Peninsula; was wounded at Fair Oaks; was in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam; and commanded a division in the 11th Army Corps at. Chancellorsville. In the Richmond campaign of 1864-65 he was continually engaged, and in December, 1864, he was in temporary command of the 24th Army Corps. In April, 1865, he was brevetted major-general of volunteers, and in 1867 was appointed a justice of the Superior Court of Massachusetts. He was United States Attorney-General in 1877-81, and justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1881 till his death, in Boston, Jan. 7, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gordon, George Henry 1825-1886 (search)
Gordon, George Henry 1825-1886 Military officer; born in Charlestown, Mass., July 19, 1825; graduated at the United States. Military Academy in 1846; served in the war with Mexico, participating in the siege of Vera Cruz, the actions of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, and Chapultepec, and the capture of the city of Mexico. During the Civil War his bravery was conspicuous in many battles. He received the brevet of major-general of volunteers in April, 1865. He was the author of The army of Virginia from Cedar Mountain to Alexandria; A War diary; and From. Brook to Cedar Mountain. He died in Framingham, Mass., Aug. 30, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grady, Henry Woodfen 1851-1892 (search)
ar with me while I tell you of another army that sought its home at the close of the late war? An army that marched home in defeat and not in victory; in pathos and not in splendor, but in glory that equalled yours, and to hearts as loving as ever welcomed heroes. Let me picture to you the footsore Confederate soldier as, buttoning up in his faded gray jacket the parole which was to bear testimony to his children of his fidelity and faith, he turned his face southward from Appomattox in April, 1865. Think of him as ragged, half starved, heavy hearted, enfeebled by want and wounds; having fought to exhaustion he surrenders his gun, wrings the hands of his comrades in silence, and, lifting his tear-stained and pallid face for the last time to the graves that dot the old Virginia hills, pulls his gray cap over his brow and begins the slow and painful journey. What does he find? Let me ask you who went to your homes eager to find, in the welcome you had justly earned, full payment
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Halleck, Henry wager 1815- (search)
tlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice of law in San Francisco. In August, 1861, he was appointed a major-general of the regular army, and succeeded Fremont in command of the Western Department in November. In 1862 he took command of the army before Corinth, and in July of that year he was appointed general-in-chief, and held that post until superseded by Grant, when he became chief of staff of the army, remaining such till April, 1865, when he was placed in command of the Military Division of the James, with his headquarters at Richmond. In August he was transferred to the Division of the Pacific, and in March, 1869, to that of the South, with headquarters at Louisville, where he died Jan. 9, 1872. General Halleck published several works upon military and scientific topics.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McLaws, Lafayette 1821-1897 (search)
McLaws, Lafayette 1821-1897 Military officer; born in Augusta., Ga., Jan. 15, 1821; graduated at West Point in 1842; remained in the army until 1861, when he joined the Confederates, and became one of the most active of their military leaders. He had served in the war against Mexico. Made a major-general in the Confederate army, he commanded a division under Lee, and was distinguished at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and at Averasboro, N. C. He surrendered with Johnston's army in April, 1865; was afterwards collector of internal revenue and postmaster in Savannah; and lectured on The Maryland campaign. He died in Savannah, July 24, 1897.
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