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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 306 306 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 62 62 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 56 56 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 35 35 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 19 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 2nd, 1865 AD or search for April 2nd, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
, and manned the heavy guns on the line of the Richmond defences. We were also well drilled in infantry tactics, and were armed with rifles. I wish that it was possible to give all the names of the command, but space would not permit it, even if I could recall them after all of these years. I would be glad to see published a complete roster of all officers and men of the Artillery Brigade, at the time of the evacuation, and of those who were at Sailor's Creek. On the afternoon of Sunday, April 2d, 1865, rumors reached our lines of important movements pending. That night we received marching orders, and were under way by midnight. As our supplies of every description were exceedingly scant we were strictly in light marching order. Our daily rations for some time past had been one pound of cornmeal and a quarter of a pound of bacon. The bacon was alternated with a pound of fresh beef. Both the bacon and the beef were occasionally substituted by a gill of sorghum. So we started
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
utenant-colonel, and Captain J. T. Wilson to be major. The regiment was engaged in a very hard-fought battle at Ream's Station, when the divisions under Wilcox, Mahone and Johnson attacked the enemy and captured about 2,000 prisoners. Hill attacked General Warren at the Davis house, on the Weldon road, three miles from the city, August 21, 1864, defeating him and capturing 2,700 prisoners. The regiment suffered severely in this engagement. The command remained around Petersburg until April 2, 1865, when the Confederate lines were pierced in three places. The 38th was ordered out of the works, and was soon thereafter on the retreat from Petersburg. The enemy were pursuing the retreating troops very hard, and first one regiment and then another were thrown out as skirmishers to retard the enemy. A line of battle was formed and breastworks were thrown up at Southerland's farm, and when the enemy made an attack they were repulsed with heavy loss and several prisoners were captured
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
discharge of duty with alacrity to the last. Owing to the capture of a large number of the members on the morning of April 2, 1865, where the Confederate line was first broken, near the P. and W. railroad, there were only about forty of the companyrsburg, July 30, 1864; John L. Drayboud, James T. Paxton, Franklin Shaver, and Lieutenant Samuel Wallace, Petersburg, April 2, 1865. Dicdfrom Wounds—W. H. Paxton, wounded at Strasburg, June 1, 1862;——Houcher, wounded at Cross Keys, June 8, 1862; lle, May 3, 1862; James P. Cash and William H. Cash, Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; William M. Crist, Petersburg, April 2, 1865, lost leg; H. W. Decker, 1862; James P. Ford, Petersburg, July 30, 1864; George J. Hamilton, Petersburg, April 2, 186April 2, 1865; Robert W. Johnston, Petersburg, 1864; Robert McNutt, Spotsylvania, May 1864; D. A. Ott, Strasburg, June I, 1862, lost arm; Thomas Paxton, Strasburg, June 1, 1862; Franklin Shewey, Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; C. D. Vess, Cross Keys, June 8,<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ight be the probable effect upon Congress and the people in general of this disclosure of the Confederacy's limited resources. It was decided that this would never do, and the committee was in a quandary. At Mr. Benjamin's own suggestion the committee recommended that he be censured by Congress for neglect of duty. History contains no parallel of such patriotism. In Danville. Mr. Benjamin evidently did not accompany the presidential party from Richmond to Danville on the fateful April 2, 1865, for on the following day he was met in the streets of the latter city by Rev. Dr. Hoge, of Richmond, who, after questioning him closely, learned that he, unlike the remainder of President Davis' Cabinet, was not the guest of Major Sutherlin. Being hard pressed by the reverend gentleman, Mr. Benjamin reluctantly admitted that he had, owing to the crowded condition of the city, been unable to secure board. (Dr. Hoge, in answer to a query, assures me that this was simply an accident and w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
s disabled and left, as it was impossible to bring it off the field when the regiment was ordered to return to the position it occupied at the commencement of the fight. The affair at Burgess' Mill was marred by the misunderstanding of his orders by an officer in high rank, by which he failed to reinforce as instructed, General MacRae, causing a heavy loss to his brigade. From Burgess' Mill the regiment again returned to its old position in the entrenchments at Petersburg. On the 2nd of April, 1865, the Confederate lines having been pierced and broken through, the regiment under orders commenced its retreat towards Amelia Courthouse, which place it reached on the 4th of April. Its line of march was marked by constant and bloody engagements with the Federal troops, which followed in close pursuit but who were entirely unable to produce the slightest demoralization or panic. At Sutherlin's station the fight was severe. On the night of the 5th it left Amelia Courthouse and reache