hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for April 3rd, 1865 AD or search for April 3rd, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
oriously, as it had begun. We went into camp at the Wall house and all preparations were made to cross the river next morning and completely shut in the town. [The preceding letter like many others, was written several days after the events described. The victory was so overwhelming that all Lyman actually wrote home that night was:] Headquarters Army of the Potomac Sunday, April 2, 1865 11 P. M. my dear Mimi:-- the Rebellion has gone up! Theodore Lyman Lt.-Col. & Vol. A. D.C. April 3, 1865 We began our day early, for, about light, I heard Duane say, outside my tent: They have evacuated Petersburg. Sure enough, they were gone, across the river, and, at that very moment, their troops at Richmond, and all along the river, with their artillery and trains, were marching in all haste, hoping to join each other and get to Burkeville Junction, en route for Danville. How they succeeded will be seen in the sequel. General Meade, to my great satisfaction, said he would ride in