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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 115 115 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 41 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 41 41 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 6: Appomattox. (search)
Chapter 6: Appomattox. The darkest hours before the dawn of April 9, 1865, shrouded the Fifth Corps sunk in feverish sleep by the roadside six miles away from Appomattox Station on the Southside Road. Scarcely is the first broken dream begun when a cavalryman comes splashing down the road and vigorously dismounts, pulling from his jacket-front a crumpled note. The sentinel standing watch by his commander, worn in body but alert in every sense, touches your shoulder. Orders, sir, I thinus evening; far into the night gleamed some irrepressible camp fire and echoed the irrepressible cheer in which men voiced their deepest thought,--how different for each, no other knows! At last we sleep-those who can. And so ended that 9th of April, 1865-Palm Sunday,--in that obscure little Virginia village now blazoned for immortal fame. Graver destinies were determined on that humble field than on many of classic and poetic fame. And though the issue brought bitterness to some, yet the
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
On the morning of the 9th General Grant dispatched another note to General Lee as follows: April 9, 1865. General: Your note of yesterday is received. I have no authority to treat on the subjecrshall, of Lee's staff, by whom he was conducted to the general. To this note Lee replied: April 9, 1865. General: I received your note of this morning on the picket line whither I had come to m Grant, who received this note eight or nine miles from Appomattox, at once answered it. April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee, commanding C. S. A.: Your note of this date is but this moment (I 1.5, and at General Lee's request reduced to writing, as follows: Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst., I proposthe Army of Northern Virginia, General Lee replied: headquarters army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: I received your letter of this date, containing the terms of the surrender of t
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Negotiations at Appomattox-interview with Lee at McLean's House-the terms of surrender-lee's surrender-interview with Lee after the surrender (search)
his army, and I answered him as follows: Headquarters Armies of the U. S., April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A. Your note of yesterday is receivet an escort with the officer bearing this message through his lines to me. April 9, 1865 General:--I received your note of this morning on the picket-line whithehe note I was cured. I wrote the following note in reply and hastened on: April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Armies. Your note of this date is buls, and commenced writing out the following terms: Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865 Gen. R. E. Lee, Comd'g C. S. A. Gen.: In accordance with the substance nd wrote out the following letter: Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865 General:--I received your letter of this date containing the terms of ttelegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The end of the war-the March to Washington- one of Lincoln's anecdotes-grand review at Washington-characteristics of Lincoln and Stanton-estimate of the different corps commanders (search)
major-general of volunteers. He is a man who makes friends of those under him by his consideration of their wants and their dues. As a commander, he won their confidence by his coolness in action and by his clearness of perception in taking in the situation under which he was placed at any given time. Griffin, Humphreys, and Mackenzie were good corps commanders, but came into that position so near to the close of the war as not to attract public attention. All three served as such, in the last campaign of the armies of the Potomac and the James, which culminated at Appomattox Court House, on the 9th of April, 1865. The sudden collapse of the rebellion monopolized attention to the exclusion of almost everything else. I regarded Mackenzie as the most promising young officer in the army. Graduating at West Point, as he did, during the second year of the war, he had won his way up to the command of a corps before its close. This he did upon his own merit and without influence.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
sed their hands gently over the sides of Traveller. He rode with his hat off, and had sufficient control to fix his eyes on a line between the ears of Traveller and look neither to right nor left until he reached a large white-oak tree, where he dismounted to make his last Headquarters, and finally talked a little. The shock was most severe upon Field's division. Seasoned by four years of battle triumphant, the veterans in that body stood at Appomattox when the sun rose on the 9th day of April, 1865, as invincible of valor as on the morning of the 31st of August, 1862, after breaking up the Union lines of the second field of Manassas. They had learned little of the disasters about Petersburg, less of that at Sailor's Creek, and surrender had not had time to enter their minds until it was announced accomplished! The reported opportunity to break through the enemy's lines proved a mistake. General Mumford, suspecting surrender from the sudden quiet of the front, made a dashi
er into a political negotiation, and also the news that a formidable force of infantry barred the way and covered the adjacent hills and valley. The marching of the Confederate army was over forever, and Lee, suddenly brought to a sense of his real situation, sent orders to cease hostilities, and wrote another note to Grant, asking an interview for the purpose of surrendering his army. The meeting took place at the house of Wilmer McLean, in the edge of the village of Appomattox, on April 9, 1865. Lee met Grant at the threshold, and ushered him into a small and barely furnished parlor, where were soon assembled the leading officers of the national army. General Lee was accompanied only by his secretary, Colonel Charles Marshall. A short conversation led up to a request from Lee for the terms on which the surrender of his army would be received. Grant briefly stated them, and then wrote them out. Men and officers were to be paroled, and the arms, artillery, and public property
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
g of the 9th I returned him an answer as follows, and immediately started to join the column south of theAppomattox: April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee: General: Your note of yesterday is received. I have no authority to treat on the subject of piations for a surrender. Before reaching General Sheridan's headquarters I received the following from General Lee: April 9, 1865. Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant: General: I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, whither I had come to pomattox Court-House, the result of which is set forth in the following correspondence: Appomattox Court-house, Va., April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee: General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose tothe laws in force where they may reside. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant: General: I received your letter of this date containing the terms of surrender of the Ar
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 29 (search)
some good fortune were to overtake you before night. He smiled, and replied: The best thing that could happen to me to-day would be to get rid of the pain I am suffering. We were soon joined by some others of the staff, and the general was induced to walk over to Meade's headquarters with us and get some coffee, in the hope that it would do him good. He seemed to feel a little better then, and after writing the following letter to Lee, and despatching it, he prepared to move forward. April 9, 1865. General: Your note of yesterday is received. As I have no authority to treat on the subject of peace, the meeting proposed for 10 A. M. to-day could lead to no good. I will state, however, general, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 30 (search)
It was found to be a reply from Lee, which had been sent into our lines on Humphreys's front. It read as follows: April 9, 1865. General: I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, whither I had come to meet you and ascertain ded read these letters, dismounted, sat down on the grassy bank by the roadside, and wrote the following reply to Lee: April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Army: Your note of this date is but this moment (11:50 A. M.) received, in coepped forward, took the book, and passed it to General Lee. The terms were as follows: Appomattox Court-House, Va., April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A. General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th ipages to the colonel. The letter — when completed read — as follows: Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: I have received your letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern V
ind, to write a history of the Confederacy, and I thought my desire to assist him would overcome any patriotic memory. Mr. Davis sent for the letter and message books, which had been secretly taken from their place of concealment, sent to Canada in the trunk of our sister, and deposited in the Bank of Montreal. We looked over them to mark, for copying, such of the contents as would be of use, and I was to copy and arrange them by dates. We came very soon upon this telegram. Danville, April 9, 1865. General R. E. Lee: You will realize the reluctance I feel to leave the soil of Virginia, and appreciate my anxiety to win success north of the Roanoke. I hope soon to hear from you at this point, where offices have been opened to keep up the current business, until more definite knowledge would enable us to form more definite plans. May God sustain and guide you. Jefferson Davis. All the anguish of that last great struggle came over us, we saw our gaunt, half-clothed, and ha
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