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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 115 115 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 41 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 41 41 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 9th, 1865 AD or search for April 9th, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
hrough the war together. I have done the best I could for you. My heart is too full to say more. We all know the grand pathos of those simple words, of that slight tremble in his voice, and it was no shame on our manhood that something upon the soldier's cheek washed off the stains of powder; that our tears answered to those in the eyes of our grand old chieftain, and that we could only grasp the hand of Uncle Robert and pray, God help you, General. His last order, issued that day, April 9, 1865, is historical, and I will not refer to it. I will only say, could anything be grander? Thus our battle flags were furled forever, and we bade a long farewell to all quality, pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war. Thus were the five companies of the Battalion of Washington Artillery tried, amidst the clangor of resounding arms, during the four years of active warfare, gaining for themselves the admiration not only of their own countrymen, but of the soldiers of the world— n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
hrough the war together. I have done the best I could for you. My heart is too full to say more. We all know the grand pathos of those simple words, of that slight tremble in his voice, and it was no shame on our manhood that something upon the soldier's cheek washed off the stains of powder; that our tears answered to those in the eyes of our grand old chieftain, and that we could only grasp the hand of Uncle Robert and pray, God help you, General. His last order, issued that day, April 9, 1865, is historical, and I will not refer to it. I will only say, could anything be grander? Thus our battle flags were furled forever, and we bade a long farewell to all quality, pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war. Thus were the five companies of the Battalion of Washington Artillery tried, amidst the clangor of resounding arms, during the four years of active warfare, gaining for themselves the admiration not only of their own countrymen, but of the soldiers of the world— n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
from whom sprung two such sons—fortunate the army that always had a leader worthy of it—happy he who can transmit his place to one so well qualified to fill it—and happy likewise he who has had such predecessor to prepare the way for victory. General Lee in command of the Army of Northern Virginia—Richmond, Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg. On the 3d of June, 1862, General Lee was assigned to command in person the Army of Northern Virginia; and from that day to April 9th, 1865, nearly three years, he was at its head. And on the page of history now laid open are crowded schemes of war and feats of arms as brilliant as ever thrilled the soul of heroism and genius with admiration,—a page of history that feasted glory till pity cried, no more. Swift was Lee to plan, and swift to execute. Making a feint of reinforcing Jackson in the Valley, startling the Federal authorities with apprehensions of attack on the Potomac lines, and practically eliminating McDowe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
is oration before the veterans of the Army of the Potomac, at their last reunion, Major Maginnis gave an estimate of losses of this army, which we think can be shown to be greatly below the real figures, but we give his figures as a most eloquent tribute to the prowess of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the skill of our great commander: He said: From May, 1861, to March, 1864, the losses of the Army of the Potomac were, in killed, 15,220; wounded, 65,850; captured, 31,378; in all, 112,448. From May 1, 1864, to April 9, 1865, killed, 12,500; wounded, 69,500; captured or missing, 28,000; aggregate, 110,000. From the beginning to the close of the war, killed, 27,720; wounded, 155,652; captured or missing, 59,378. A grand aggregate of 242,750. Added those who died of gunshot wounds, the number of men who lost their lives in action in the Army of the Potomac was 48,902, probably one-half of all who died from wounds on the field of battle in all the armies of the United States.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. (search)
t but a few hours— men and horses were utterly worn down by fatigue, loss of sleep and hunger. Thousands were leaving their commands and wandering about the devastated country in quest of food, and they had no muskets. Each hour the enemy was drawing his anaconda coil around us more closely. The throes of dissolution had commenced, and we would go out with the tide. The oil in the lamp was burning low, and the light was going out forever. The surrender—Appomattox Courthouse, Sunday April 9th, 1865. We started early and moved in the direction of Appomattox Courthouse. When reaching that place 'twas evident we could go no farther, for the enemy, cavalry, infantry and artillery, in countless thousands, were on every side. A shell comes hurtling down the lines; others follow fast and follow faster; just as cheerfully and just as defiantly as at Bethel, four years ago, when our hopes were big with the fate and fame of a new-born nation, do our boys go forth to meet them, and