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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
the National Capital. According to a proclamation by his successor (Andrew Johnson), there was evidence in the Bureau of Military Justice, that there had been a conspiracy formed by Jefferson Davis, Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverly Tucker, George N. Saunders, William C. Cleary, and other rebels and traitors against the Government of the United States, harbored in Canada, to assassinate the President, and the Secretary of State, Mr. Seward; See President Johnson's Proclamation, May 2, 1865. In that proclamation, signed by him and by W. Hunter, Acting Secretary of State, a reward of one hundred thousand dollars was offered for the arrest of Jefferson Davis; twenty-five thousand dollars apiece for the arrest of Jacob Thompson, C. C. Clay, George N. Saunders, and Beverly Tucker; and ten thousand dollars for the arrest of William C. Cleary, late clerk of C. C. Clay. and circumstances seemed to warrant the charge that they had intended the same fate for other members of the Cab
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. By Judge W. W. Cleary. [The following paper was read before the Louisville Branch of the Southern Historical Society and well deserves a place in our records that the future historian may see what methods were employed to blacken the name and fame of Confederate leaders.] On the 2d day of May, 1865, his Excellency, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, published to the world the following proclamation-viz: By the President of the United States: Whereas, it appears from evidence in the Bureau of Military Justice that the atrocious murder of the late President, and the attempted murder of the Hon. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State, was incited, concocted and procured by and between Jeff. Davis, late of Richmond, Virginia; and Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverley Tucker, George N. Sanders, W. W. Cleary, and other rebels and traitors against the govern
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hoffman, Frederick L. 1865- (search)
Hoffman, Frederick L. 1865- Author; born in Varel, North Germany, May 2, 1865; is a member of numerous foreign and American statistical and other organizations, and besides contributing to magazines and technical periodicals is author of Race, traits, and tendencies of the American negro; On the Sanitary condition of the Trinity tenements, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seward, William Henry 1801-1872 (search)
riod of the Civil War, and continued in President Johnson's cabinet, filling the same office, until 1869. He was a conspicuous opposer of slavery for many years, in and out of Congress. He opposed the compromise acts of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska bill of 1854, and was one of the founders of the Republican party. The two most important subjects of his diplomacy during the Civil War were the liberation of Mason and Slidell and the French invasion of Mexico. According to a proclamation, May 2, 1865, of President Johnson, there was evidence in the bureau of military justice that there had been a conspiracy formed by Jefferson Davis, Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverly Tucker, George N. Saunders, William C. Cleary, and other rebels and traitors, against the government of the United States, harbored in Canada, to assassinate the President and the Secretary of State. Circumstances seemed to warrant a suspicion that the same fate was intended for other officers of the government,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Memorandum for a peace, signed by Generals Sherman and Johnston at Durham Station, N. C., April 18, is rejected at Washington April 21. Grant arrives at Raleigh April 24, and General Johnston surrenders to Sherman at Bennett's house, near Durham Station......April 26, 1865 Executive order for trial by military commission of alleged assassins of President Lincoln issued......May 1, 1865 Reward of $100,000 offered for the capture of Jefferson Davis by proclamation of President......May 2, 1865 Confederate Gen. Richard Taylor surrenders at Citronelle, near Mobile, Ala.......May 4, 1865 Executive order re-establishing authority of the United States in Virginia recognizes Francis H. Pierpont as governor......May 10, 1865 Jefferson Davis captured, with his wife, mother, Postmaster-General Reagan, Colonel Harrison, Johnson, and others, by 4th Michigan Cavalry, under Colonel Pritchard, at Irwinsville, Ga.......May 10, 1865 [Davis taken to Fortress Monroe.] Last fight o
26, 1871. 128,770WestJuly 9, 1872. 129,974ManningJuly 30, 1872. 130,116Fairfield et al.Aug. 6, 1872. 130,674WestAug. 20, 1872. 130,675WestAug. 20, 1872. 133,757ChandlerDec. 10, 1872. 136,976DinsmoreMar. 18, 1873. 139,368ChandlerMay 27, 1873. 141,332CushmanJuly 29, 1873. 142,442CushmanSept. 2, 1873. 145,515ManningDec. 16, 1873. 153,718ManningAug. 4, 1874. 5. Mounting Machines on Table. No.Name.Date. 27,926PerkinsApr. 17, 1860. 41,393PilbeamJan. 26, 1864. 47,560NiederpruemMay 2, 1865. 97,481CowgillDec. 7, 1869. 105,548ChaseJuly 19, 1870. 119,784ParhamOct. 10, 1871. 152,829ColesJuly 7, 1874. 6. Needles. 17,272GarveyMay 12, 1857. 24,892SingerJuly 26, 1859. 27,409HornMar. 6, 1860. 29,448WillcoxJuly 31, 1860. 29,648DrakeAug. 14, 1860. 31,757WillcoxMar. 19, 1861. 34,571GroverMar. 4, 1862. 37,996AmblerMar. 24, 1863. 38,282BrownApr. 28, 1863. 55,927StannardJune 26, 1866. 67,536HarrisAug. 6, 1867. 79,983IsbellJuly 14, 1869. 88,665Parham et al.Apr. 16, 1869.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Minnesota, 1865 (search)
1865 May 2: Affair, Blue Earth Run  May 8: Skirmish, CoteauIndian Scouts.
J. C. Briscoe Bvt. Brigadier GeneralMay 2, 1865, to June 28, 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Col. 199th Penn. InfantryNov. 6, 1864, to Nov. 18, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the James
C. W. Eckman Col. 92d Penn. InfantryApr. 22, 1865, to May 2, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
a Brigadier GeneralAug. 16, 1863, to Dec. 16, 1863. Foster's 1st Brigade, U. S. Forces North end of Folly Island., Department of the South Brigadier GeneralAug. 23, 1864, to Dec. 3, 1864. 2d Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralDec. 16, 1863, to Jan. 15, 1864. U. S. Forces North end of Folly Island., Department of the South Brigadier GeneralDec. 6, 1864, Jan. 1, 1865. 1st Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralFeb. 2, 1865, to May 2, 1865. 1st Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralFeb. 25, 1864, to Feb. 28, 1864. 1st Brigade, Vodges' 2d Division, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralFeb. 28, 1864, to Apr. 25, 1864. Vodges' 2d Division, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralJan. 15, 1864, to Feb. 25, 1864. Vodges' Division, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralJuly 18, 1864, to July 23, 1864. 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralJuly 23, 1864,
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