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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 738 738 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for June, 1865 AD or search for June, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 7 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
Vice-President of the Confederacy. The governor of Georgia ordered the seizure of the public property of the United States within the limits of his State, and war made havoc on its coasts and in the interior. Sherman swept through the State with a large army late in 1864, living off the country, and within its borders the President of the Confederacy was captured in May, 1865 (see Davis, Jefferson). Within its borders was the famous Andersonville prison-pen (see Confederate prisons). In June, 1865, Seal of Georgia. a provisional governor was appointed for the State. A convention held at Milledgeville late in October repealed the ordinance of secession, declared the war debt void. amended the constitution so as to abolish slavery, and in November elected a governor, legislature, and members of Congress. Congress did not approve these measures, and the Senators and Representatives chosen were not admitted to seats. In 1867, Georgia, with Alabama and Florida, formed a military di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grover, Cuvier 1829- (search)
Grover, Cuvier 1829- Military officer; born in Bethel, Me., July 24, 1829; graduated at West Point in 1850, entering the 1st Artillery. He was made brigadier-general of volunteers in April, 1861, and commanded a brigade in Heintzelman's corps in the Army of the Potomac. When Hooker took command of the troops at Fairfax (1862), General Grover took that officer's division. From December, 1862, to July, 1864, he commanded a division of the 19th Corps in the Department of the Gulf. He was in the Shenandoah campaign in 1864; and from January till June, 1865, he was in command of the District of Savannah. General Grover was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general in the regular army, March 13, 1865, for meritorious services during the Rebellion ; was promoted to lieutenantcolonel of the 38th Infantry in 1866, and colonel of the 1st Cavalry in 1875, which command he held till his death in Atlantic City, N. J., June 6, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Humphreys, Andrew Atkinson 1810-1883 (search)
Nov. 2, 1810; graduated at West Point in 1831; distinguished himself in Florida (see Seminole War) in 1832; and resigned in 1836. He re-entered the army as lieutenant of topographical engineers in 1838. From 1845 to 1849 he assisted in the coast survey, and in 1853 took charge of the office of explorations and surveys in the War Department. He became a member of General McClellan's staff in March, 1862, and soon afterwards was made brigadier-general of volunteers. He fought at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville; was General Meade's chief of staff from July, 1863, to November, 1864, and commanded the 2d Corps from November, 1864, to June, 1865. He was brevetted major-general for meritorious services in the siege of Petersburg and the pursuit and capture of General Lee. In 1866 he was appointed chief of the corps of engineers, and in 1879 was retired. He was author of many important reports of an engineering and scientific character. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 27, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ord, Edward Otho Cresap 1818-1883 (search)
Seminole War, and in 1845-46 was employed in coast-survey duty, when he was sent to California. He took part in expeditions against the Indians, and, in September, 1861, was made brigadier-general of volunteers, commanding a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves near the Potomac. In May, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers, and ordered to the Army of the Mississippi, where he did good service while in command at Corinth. He commanded the 13th Army Corps at the siege and capture of Jackson and Vicksburg. In the campaign against Richmond, in 1864, he commanded the 18th Corps from July to September, when he was severely wounded in the assault on Fort Harrison. He commanded the Department of Virginia from January to June, 1865, and was a participant in the capture of Lee's army in April. General Ord was brevetted major-general in the United States army, and commissioned a brigadier-general, July 26, 1866; and was retired Dec. 6, 1880. He died in Havana, Cuba, July 22, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Swayne, wager 1834- (search)
Swayne, wager 1834- Military officer; born in Columbus, O., Nov. 10, 1834; son of Judge Noah H. Swayne; graduated at Yale College in 1856; became a lawyer; and was a useful officer in the Civil War (1861-65), entering the army as major of the 43d Ohio Infantry, serving at the battles of Iuka and Corinth and in the Atlanta campaign, losing a leg at Salkahatchie. In June, 1865, he was promoted major-general of volunteers, and was afterwards assistant commissioner of refugees, freedmen, and abandoned lands. He was commissioned colonel of the 45th Infantry in 1866, and retired in 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
Raleigh......April 24, 1865 Gen. J. E. Johnston surrenders to Sherman; agreement signed at Bennett's house, near Durham station......April 26, 1865 Maj.-Gen. J. M. Schofield, appointed to command the Department of North Carolina, makes his headquarters at Raleigh......April, 1865 William W. Holden proclaimed provisional governor of the State by President Johnson......May 29, 1865 Maj.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger succeeds Schofield in command of the Department of North Carolina......June, 1865 Convention called by Provisional Governor Holden meets at Raleigh, Oct. 2, repeals the ordinance of secession, adopts an ordinance prohibiting slavery, Oct. 9, and adjourns......Oct. 19, 1865 People ratify the repeal of the ordinance of secession by 20,506 to 2,002, and the ordinance prohibiting slavery by 19,039 to 3,039......Nov. 7, 1865 Governor Holden is relieved of his trust by President Johnson, and Governor Worth assumes office......Dec. 23, 1865 Convention of colored de
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vassar College, (search)
Vassar College, The first institution for imparting a full collegiate education to women established in the world; founded by Matthew Vassar in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1861. The college edifice was erected during the Civil War, and a few weeks after its close a faculty was chosen (June, 1865). The institution was opened for the reception of students in September following, when nearly 350 young women entered. In 1864 Mr. Vassar purchased and presented to the college a collection of oil and water-color pictures for its artgallery, at a cost of $20,000, including Vassar College from the Lake. an art library of about 8,000 volumes. Mr. Vassar bequeathed to the college $50,000 as a lecture fund, $50,000 as an auxiliary fund, and $50,000 as a library, art, and cabinet fund, the income of each to be applied to the purpose for which it was intended—namely, the first-named for employing lecturers, the second for aiding meritorious students unable to pay the whole expense of a collegi